Icann criticised for 'landgrab' of Internet | world | Hindustan Times
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Icann criticised for 'landgrab' of Internet

More than 1,000 new Internet "top level domains" -such as .app, .kids, .love, .pizza and also .amazon and .google - could come online beginning early next year, with the potential to radically change the face of the Web.

world Updated: Jun 14, 2012 23:25 IST

More than 1,000 new Internet "top level domains" -such as .app, .kids, .love, .pizza and also .amazon and .google - could come online beginning early next year, with the potential to radically change the face of the Web.


But the move by Icann, the US-appointed company which decides what new domains can be added to the Web, has been criticised by some as allowing a commercial landgrab of the Internet.

Documents released by Icann on Wednesday show that Amazon and Google have made dozens of applications to control hundreds of domains - including .shop, .book, .love, and .map and .mba. The most applied-for domain is .app, which 13 organisations have staked a claim to own, including both Amazon and Google. Only one entity can own a top-level domain.

The next is .home and .inc, with 11 applications, .art with 10, and then book, .blog, .llc, and .shop with nine each.

Those put in charge of allotting such domains will have complete power over whether a company or individual can apply for a website or domain name within them - so that if Amazon was to control .book, it could deny a rival such as the chain of bookshops called Waterstones the chance to create waterstones.book.

New top-level domains, or TLDs, will start to come online in the first quarter of 2013, said Rod Beckstrom, the chief executive of Icann,who unveiled the list of 1,930 applications for 1,700 different new TLDs at a press conference in London.

"This is an historic day for the Internet and the two billion people around the world who rely on it," Beckstrom said.

Companies, individuals and communities were able to apply for the new TLDs, which cost $185,000 per registration.