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Kafeel had sent email wanting martyrdom

world Updated: Aug 20, 2007 16:47 IST

Indian national Kafeel Ahmed, who died this month due to 90 per cent burns suffered in the Glasgow airport blaze, is reported to have sent an email before the incident in which he said he wanted martyrdom.

The email is seen as a 'claim of responsibility' for the attack in Glasgow on June 30. CCTV footage of the previously attempted London car bombing on June 29 shows a man running away from the scene that relatives say was Kafeel.

The Guardian reported on Monday that on June 30, Ahmed sent a text message to a relative just after 1.30 pm, which contained a link to an email and a password to access it. Two hours later, he crashed a jeep into the terminal.

The paper reported: "Those who have seen the email regard it as Ahmed claiming responsibility for the attempted attacks on London and the one he was about to stage in Glasgow. According to a source, Ahmed says his actions were carried out in the name of Allah.

"Ahmed writes that his relative would be shocked to read what he is about to tell him about his involvement in terrorism, praises God, and says he wants martyrdom.

"Initial evidence points to the relative opening the email at 4.50 pm on Saturday, 90 minutes after Ahmed had rammed the airport. From the email, the source said, it was clear he was expecting to die."

An unnamed Whitehall source told the newspaper that it was believed that Ahmed decided to attack Glasgow after fearing the police would soon hunt him down, which meant that the planning was rushed.

"The Guardian understands that police have CCTV images that show Ahmed apparently running away from the scene of the first London attack, and scurrying away from a car the terrorists meant to explode. Relatives shown the images are said to be nearly certain it is him."

The police also reportedly seized his computer and found evidence that it had been used to scour websites on the construction of bombs and explosives.