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LTTE diaries may prove foreign link

A bunch of yellowing diaries found in a former Tamil Tiger hideout in northern Sri Lanka could provide vital clues to Lankan intelligence agencies about the rebels' existing international and fund raising networks. Sutirtho Patranobis reports.

world Updated: Jul 24, 2010 00:14 IST
Sutirtho Patranobis

A bunch of yellowing diaries found in a former Tamil Tiger hideout in northern Sri Lanka could provide vital clues to Lankan intelligence agencies about the rebels' existing international and fund raising networks.

Sri Lankan army search teams stumbled upon not only the diaries but scores of abandoned passports and other documents during a search operation in Viswamadu, which is not very far from the final theatre of battle in north-eastern Sri Lanka.

According to the defence ministry, the diaries and the documents have so far yielded vital information about the LTTE's alleged involvement in human trafficking, arms smuggling and financial dealings in east Asia, western Europe, Canada and Africa.

The documents have also revealed information about LTTE investments around the world and transactions connected to the group's shipping operations.

The defence ministry claimed that Lankan intelligence agencies were on the verge of arresting an LTTE cadre Narendran, a Tamilian married to a Russian, operating from a country in Europe.

The ministry added that they were also tracking two more people, Bhavidaran and Rooban, who are allegedly running LTTE front offices in Indonesia.

Colombo is also pursuing several governments to dismantle three broad groups that are now assumed to be controlling the remaining pro-LTTE international factions: the US group is said to be headed by V. Rudrakumaran, the UK group by Aruththanthai Emmanuel of the World Tamil Forum (WTF) and the Norway group by Nediyavan.

Recently, at least eight persons in the Netherlands and five in Germany were arrested by the respective government agencies on suspicion of having links with the LTTE.

The Sri Lanka government is also using diplomatic channels to stall pro-LTTE activities and dismantle arms smuggling network in the African country of Eritrea.

In early 2009, the Tamil Tigers here were ready to receive a consignment of several dismantled light aircraft to be shipped from the Eritrean coastline. But before the shipment could be sent, the civil war ended here.