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N Korean army threatens to stop border crossing

North Korea's military on Saturday threatened to bar South Koreans from crossing into the North in protest against anti-Pyongyang leaflets sent from the South.

world Updated: Apr 10, 2010 19:29 IST

North Korea's military on Saturday threatened to bar South Koreans from crossing into the North in protest against anti-Pyongyang leaflets sent from the South.

It said it would examine whether to continue abiding by an agreement to provide a military guarantee for the passage of personnel through the buffer zone dividing the two Koreas.

"The KPA (Korean People's Army) will take corresponding decisive measures soon unless the South side takes an understandable measure for discontinuing the despicable psychological smear campaign," it said.

The North's military has "repeatedly and strongly" urged Seoul to discontinue the anti-North Korea campaign, it said in a notice sent to the South's military and carried by Pyongyang's official Korean Central News Agency.

It denounced the South for "massively scattering leaflets defiling the DPRK's (North Korea's) ideology and system and videos of indecent property and even DVDs showing the decadent bourgeois life."

"Such foolish act is a wanton violation and blatant challenge to the agreement reached between the militaries of the two sides to stop all the propaganda activities against each other," it said.

In a response to the North's warning against the leaflets, carried by Yonhap news agency, the South Korean government said: "We have sincerely implemented the (2004) agreement to end propaganda campaigns against each other and we hope the issue does not make a hitch in the development of inter-Korean relations."

South Korean activists who float anti-Pyongyang leaflets into North Korea by balloon said last month that they had also started sending DVDs disclosing secrets about the private life of leader Kim Jong-Il.

Inter-Korean ties are at a low ebb over the North's nuclear weapons programme.

On Thursday, the North said it had scrapped a tourism deal with South Korea and would "freeze" some assets owned by Seoul at a mountain resort in the communist state.

The North also said it was expelling some South Korean personnel from Mount Kumgang on its east coast and would let a new partner take over the tour business there.