Nepal's ex-Crown Prince Paras may 'lose elite army security' | world | Hindustan Times
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Nepal's ex-Crown Prince Paras may 'lose elite army security'

Nepal's controversial former Crown Prince Paras Shah, who was involved in a gun brawl with the family members of deputy Prime Minister Sujata Koirala last month, may no longer get the protection of the army's elite security guards, a news report said today.

world Updated: Jan 11, 2011 21:15 IST

Nepal's controversial former Crown Prince Paras Shah, who was involved in a gun brawl with the family members of deputy Prime Minister Sujata Koirala last month, may no longer get the protection of the army's elite security guards, a news report said on Tuesday.

38-year-old Paras, notorious for his playboy lifestyle, was freed on bail after being arrested for firing his gun in a forest resort in Chitwan during a late-night drunken brawl with the son-in-law and the daughter of the deputy premier on December 11.

The Nepal Army (NA) is in no mood this time to depute its personnel, who were pulled out after the "infamous" Tiger Tops firing incident, for his security, said myrepublica, the website of Republica newspaper today.

"While the ex-royals get out on drinking sprees and recreational activities, how long can commoners´ sons become scapegoats of their misconduct," an army source was quoted as saying in the report.

The unnamed source was of the opinion that under no circumstances was the army going to re-depute personnel for the security of Paras, who has been involved in numerous gun brawls under the influence of alcohol.

The former royals continue to enjoy the security of the elite guards from the Nepal Police, Armed Police Force and Nepal Army, who are paid from state coffers.

Paras, the only son of deposed King Gyanendra, had been involved in several escapades in the Nepalese capital's night spots. He had earlier allegedly opened fire in the capital's five star Everest Hotel during an altercation while he was accompanied by his wife Himani, the report said.

Following the Tiger Tops gun brawl last month, seven Nepal Army personnel under the command of captain Suraj Thapa were dragged into the controversy as the legal status of the weapon that Paras fired from was brought into question.

A Court of Inquiry was set up on December 14 to look into the incident even as the army withdrew its elite security personnel to headquarters.

No action was initiated against them as the army believed that its personnel had nothing to do with the firing and they had merely become scapegoats.

Moreover, the army had also turned down the request of the Ministry of Home Affairs to hand over the seven security personnel to the civilian authority.

Nepal's almost three-century-old monarchy was abolished in 2008 when Paras's father Gyanendra was dethroned after the landmark Constituent Assembly elections that brought the Maoists to power.

Paras, who has been mostly staying in Singapore since he left the Narayanhiti Royal Palace in the heart of the capital in June 2008, has returned to Nepal recently where his wife has launched a fund to help deprived women, in a move widely seen as an attempt to rehabilitate the family's battered public image.