'No global climate pact can work without India, China' | world | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Dec 04, 2016-Sunday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

'No global climate pact can work without India, China'

world Updated: Jul 06, 2008 19:41 IST

PTI
Highlight Story

No global climate change pact could be fruitful without including India and China, US President George W Bush on Sunday said in Tokyo as leaders from the G-8 nations prepared to thrash out a long-term deal to face global warming.

"I'll be constructive," Bush said after talks with Japanese Premier Yasuo Fukuda, but "we're not going to solve the problem" unless those two fast-growing economies take part in any long-term deal," Japanese media reported.

Bush, who is on a visit to Japan to attend G-8 summit that begins tomorrow in Hokkaido, will meet world's top leaders including Prime Minister Manmoham Singh on the sidelines of the summit.

Host Japan has made climate change a key topic at the meeting, and many hope the G-8 will give some indication of its commitment to cutting greenhouse gases to move forward UN-led talks aimed at replacing the Kyoto Protocol on climate change, which expires in 2012.

The three-day summit also includes meetings between the G-8 and the G-5 that includes major developing nations -- India, China, Brazil, South Africa and Mexico.

The meeting between G-8 and G-5 in Japan will review the Heilegendamm dialogue process where issues like climate change and energy security will come up for discussion.

Multilateral meeting will focus on the agreed framework on climate change after starting from Rio, Kyoto and Bali summits and the long-term goals.

India's approach on climate change is that developed countries should limit their carbon emissions much below their present levels, which they are not doing and developing countries would do their bit to mitigate the emissions.

India recently issued its national action plan for climate change, declaring that its greenhouse emissions will not be more than the developed countries.