Obama has 'rekindled hope for a world at peace': ElBaradei | world | Hindustan Times
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Obama has 'rekindled hope for a world at peace': ElBaradei

The UN's nuclear watchdog chief Mohamed ElBaradei said Friday he was "absolutely delighted" that US President Barack Obama had been awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

world Updated: Oct 09, 2009 17:31 IST

The UN's nuclear watchdog chief Mohamed ElBaradei said Friday he was "absolutely delighted" that US President Barack Obama had been awarded this year's Nobel Peace Prize.

"In less than a year in office, he has transformed the way we look at ourselves and the world we live in and rekindled hope for a world at peace with itself," the director-general of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) said in a statement.

"I cannot think of anyone today more deserving of this honour," added ElBaradei, who himself won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2005 with the IAEA.

Since taking office on January 20, "President Obama has brought a new vision of a world based on human decency, fairness and freedom which is an inspiration to us all," the IAEA chief said.

"He has shown an unshakeable commitment to diplomacy, mutual respect and dialogue as the best means of resolving conflicts.

"He has reached out across divides and made clear that he sees the world as one human family, regardless of religion, race or ethnicity," he added.

ElBaradei also praised Obama's stance on nuclear issues.

"President Obama has provided outstanding leadership on moving towards a world free of nuclear weapons," he said.

Tibor Toth, head of the CTBTO preparatory commission, another UN-backed nuclear group, also congratulated Obama on his Nobel Prize.

"The road towards achieving nuclear disarmament that President Barack Obama has chosen to travel can be an arduous path" and the award "can only strengthen his resolve," Toth said in a statement.

The commission is preparing for the future entry into force of the Comprehensive Test-Ban Treaty, which bans all nuclear testing.

But the CTBT is still missing crucial ratifications from states like China, North Korea, India, Iran, Israel, Pakistan and the United States.

Obama signalled in April that he would seek Senate ratification of the treaty, reversing the stance of George W. Bush's administration.