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Obama to focus on economy at party convention

In the Democratic convention starting Tuesday, US President Barack Obama will make a case for four more years for himself before an electorate that doesn't think much of his record on economy.

world Updated: Sep 05, 2012 02:00 IST
Yashwant Raj

In the Democratic convention starting Tuesday, US President Barack Obama will make a case for four more years for himself before an electorate that doesn't think much of his record on economy.

And before a party base that is widely perceived as less enthusiastic and energised than it was in 2008, putting a rookie senator in the White House.

Unemployment remains high at 8.3% and Republicans have made it their case against Obama: that he has failed because he lacks the skills to do it, unlike Mitt Romney, a professional.

The Obama campaign has been on the defensive, arguing the Republican plan is exactly what drove the economy into the present mess.

"On Thursday night, I'm going to offer you what I believe is a better path forward a path that's going to grow this economy and create more good jobs," Obama said on Monday.

People will be listening, and not just party faithfuls present in the Charlotte stadium with a capacity to seat 70,000 people. But the millions watching live on TV and web.

The party will also try to use the convention to fire up the party base — especially the young — which has seemed less energised than in 2008. That's a big worry for the campaign.

The Obama camp has used campaign events — in universities and colleges — to enthuse these voters. Whenever the audience booed at the mention of Romney or Ryan, the president said: "Don't boo, vote". That's become a campaign slogan almost.

Democratic platform mentions India
The Democratic platform released Monday said the Obama administration remains committed to investing in a long-term strategic partnership with India.

"To support its ability to serve as a regional economic anchor and provider of security in the broader Indian Ocean region," said the platform, a sort of party manifesto.