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Pak Govt might not last its tenure: Sharif

world Updated: Sep 02, 2008 14:42 IST

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Pakistan's former Premier Nawaz Sharif on Tuesday sounded a warning, saying that the PPP-led government might collapse much before its tenure if its leaders "continue their policies of breaking promises and ignoring public issues".

Emphasising that his party will not work to destabilise the government and he did want army to meddle in affairs of the state, Sharif whose PML-N broke away from the ruling coalition last week predicted that the government will not "last long", as its leaders were fast losing the trust of people.

"I don't want to make any efforts to destabilise the government, but I am afraid it will not last long due to its current way of governance and the policies of its leadership, which are fast losing the trust of leaders and the people," the PML-N chief said.

The government, which was formed in March, might not complete its five-year tenure if its leaders continued "breaking promises and ignoring public issues", Sharif told Gulf News.

Ruling out any possibility of rejoining the coalition despite requests from the PPP, Sharif said, "We have crossed that point and we don't want to enter the ruling coalition again".

Referring to the September six presidential polls, Sharif said he would not withdraw the PML-N's candidate, former Supreme Court Chief Justice Saeed-uz-Zaman Siddiqui, who is running against Zardari.

"Let us wait for polling day on September 6 as it is premature to say who will win," he said when he was asked if he saw Zardari as the next President.

On the issue of taking action against former President Musharraf, who overthrew his government in 1999 in a military coup, Sharif said: "I hold no personal vendetta against Musharraf...I am not keen on settling personal scores, but he should be taken to task for his wrongdoings."

He said the government should draw up its own policy to tackle militants in the northwestern tribal areas instead of blindly following US policies.

"The issue (militant upsurge in NWFP) should immediately be discussed in the parliament to avoid any further complications.

"Parliament should form a policy to pave the way for peaceful negotiations because such issues cannot be resolved with guns only," he told the paper.