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Pak is no haven for terrorists: Musharraf

world Updated: Sep 07, 2007 18:08 IST
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President Pervez Musharraf has warned of the threat of Pakistan becoming a safe haven for foreign terrorists, national media reported on Friday.

"(People) carry out terrorist activities in other countries and then seek refuge here. Let us not make Pakistan a soft state where law and order cannot be maintained," Musharraf said on state television late on Thursday.

The president was speaking a day after German authorities said they arrested three suspected terrorists who had received training in Pakistan in 2006 and were planning a series of bomb attacks against US citizens.

German prosecutors said on Wednesday that the two German converts to Islam and a Turkish Muslim belonged to an Uzbek-linked extremist group and had amassed the same explosive materials used to kill 52 people in the July 2005 attacks on London's public transport system.

While the foreign Mmnistry in Islamabad denies the existence of terrorist training camps in Pakistan, Musharraf acknowledged that Al-Qaeda members, mainly Arabs and Uzbeks, and Taliban insurgents were active in the country.

The US-allied military ruler urged the nation to take a firm stand against terrorism and extremism, warning that otherwise, "Pakistan's future will remain at stake."

His country was not only the source of terrorism but also its victim, Musharraf stressed, two days after suicide bombers targeted intelligence officials in Islamabad's twin city of Rawalpindi, killing some 30 people and injuring 60.

The bombings were the latest in a series of attacks by suspected pro-Taliban militants operating in the mountainous tribal areas by the border with Afghanistan.

US intelligence claims the region has emerged as a refuge for Osama bin Laden's reconstituted Al-Qaeda network.

Pakistan has deployed almost 90,000 troops down the frontier to try to stem militant and terrorist activities.