Pak should keep on working to 'really deal' with terror: Rice | world | Hindustan Times
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Pak should keep on working to 'really deal' with terror: Rice

Insisting that the steps taken by Pakistan in the wake of the Mumbai attacks are "not nearly enough", the US has advised it to keep on working to "really deal" with terrorism to help ease the "crisis" with India. See special

world Updated: Dec 20, 2008 12:32 IST

Insisting that the steps taken by Pakistan in the wake of the Mumbai attacks are "not nearly enough", the US has advised it to keep on working to "really deal" with terrorism to help ease the "crisis" with India.

Neither India nor Pakistan wanted to escalate tensions and "no one was speaking in belligerent language", Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice said at a function in Washington.

"And if Pakistan continues to work to really deal with the terrorism problem, and if India can do the hard work of both helping to bring the perpetrators to justice and trying to prevent the next attack, then I think we can get through this crisis," the top official said.

Asked if she believed the civilian government in Pakistan has control over the military and the ISI, she said civilians were very much in charge and there have been some "positive" steps "though they're not nearly enough to this point".

"I have to say that I didn't hear a different line from the military and from the civilians. In fact, I heard from the military that they want the civilian government to succeed."

Rice felt that the deepening of Indo-US ties since 2001 helped in better tackling the crisis arising out of the Mumbai terror attacks, as there is now a greater level of trust between the two countries.

She said her visit to the subcontinent following the November 26 carnage was aimed at showing solidarity with India as also giving a message to Pakistan that terrorists operating from its soil have to be dealt with and it is not enough to say that they are "non-state actors".