Palestine elects new prez, but on a reality TV show

  • Mohammed Daraghmeh
  • Updated: Jun 05, 2016 06:06 IST

RAMALLAH (WEST BANK): The winner of this “election” for Palestinian president was a 24-year-old lawyer from east Jerusalem, who defeated a woman and a Christian from Bethlehem. But this was reality television - not real life - and the vote came on a TV show called “The President” that is meant to educate young Palestinians about politics.

In reality, Palestinians haven’t had a chance to cast an actual ballot for president in over a decade.

The spirited competition among the three young finalists has drawn attention to the shortcomings of the Palestinians’ experiment with democracy, complicated by Israeli military occupation, now in its 50th year, and two decades of failed peace efforts.

The last time the Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza Strip elected a leader was in January 2005, when current President Mahmoud Abbas won by a large margin. Now polls indicate widespread discontent with Abbas and the long-ruling entrenched leadership around him.

“This show was an opportunity for the Palestinian youth to raise their voice and deliver their message,” said Waad Qannam, the winner of Thursday night’s finale, who was awarded a new car and is expected to meet Abbas.

“The show proves that we have skillful young leaders who can take over when there is an opportunity,” he said. “This is a message to the politicians to open the gates for the new generation to practice politics and prove themselves.”

The show’s format brings in elements from “Arab Idol,” a popular show in which viewers across the Middle East choose their favourite singer by voting with text messages, as well as the “The Apprentice,” the international reality show that helped put another presidential hopeful, Donald Trump, in the spotlight.

The finalists were Qannam; Fadi Khair, 30, a male nurse from the West Bank; and Naameh Adwiya, a 22-year-old woman and political science graduate from east Jerusalem. All are active in Abbas’ Fatah party.

Several hundred people packed a Ramallah auditorium for the finale. A Palestinian flag stood on the side of the stage, while a black screen with floating stars, along with the show’s logo, formed the backdrop. Senior politicians and security officials were in the audience, although Abbas was not.

Maan, a local TV network, has been airing the show for the past six months. The programme is funded by Search for Common Ground, a US non-profit group that promotes conflict resolution. The goal was to give young Palestinians an opportunity to practice running for office and voting for a candidate.

Suheir Rasul, the group’s local co-director, said the show was the only place where Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza and many other places can vote.

“Palestinian youth do not get the opportunity to engage with political leaders on this magnitude. This program is not just a TV show; it’s actually the only true democracy in practice,” she said.

It is the second time the Palestinians have held the contest.

Raed Othman, the programme’s spokesman, said 1,180 Palestinians ages 20 to 40 applied. A committee of politicians, business leaders and public personalities narrowed the list to 48 contestants. The final three were selected by a panel of judges and votes by viewers.

In his decade in power, Abbas has failed to deliver on a promise to lead Palestinians to independence, with negotiations on terms of statehood stalled since Israeli hard-liner Benjamin Netanyahu became prime minister in 2009. The Palestinian economy is stagnant, and polls have indicated two-thirds of Palestinians want Abbas to resign.

“Why watch virtual elections? We need real elections,” said Hisham Atta, a 21-year-old university student from Ramallah.

But Sawsan Abu Adel, 28, said she has enjoyed the show. AP

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