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Poetic push to promulgate Nepal constitution on time

It’s a poetic push that some hope will end differences among major parties in Nepal and help the country get its new constitution on time, reports Utpal Parashar.

world Updated: Apr 13, 2010 16:50 IST
Utpal Parashar

It’s a poetic push that some hope will end differences among major parties in Nepal and help the country get its new constitution on time.

With 45 days left for Nepal to adopt a new constitution, a group of poets under the banner of Parijat Smriti Kendra will recite poems outside residences of senior politicians to push for a timely statute.

The poetry sessions would begin on Wednesday, the start of the Nepalese new year, outside the Naya Bazaar residence of opposition Maoist chief Pushpa Kamal Dahal ‘Prachanda’ in Kathmandu.

Poems that inspired millions to come out to the streets during the pro-democracy movements in 1990 and 2006 would be recited by the poets outside the residences of ‘Prachanda’ and other leaders.

“This tactic is to pressurize leaders to arrive at a consensus to draft the constitution before the May 28 deadline and take the peace process to a logical conclusion,” said Sneh Sayami, coordinator of the organization.

After ‘Prachanda’, poets will carry out recitals outside residences of Jhalanath Khanal, chairman of CPN (UML) and Sushil Koirala, acting president of Nepali Congress—the two main parties in the ruling coalition.

Parijat Smriti Kendra was set up to preserve the memory of Bishnu Kumari Waiba, one of Nepal’s most influential poets and writers who was also called Parijat and died at the age of 56 in 1993.

On Sunday, over 40 eminent Nepali citizens appealed to parties to uphold principles of social-justice, non-violence, plurality, freedom, federalism, secularism, nationalism and separation of powers in the new constitution.

“The new constitution must incorporate non-violence, harmony, goodwill, equality and trust as its basis,” said eminent journalist Kanak Mani Dixit.