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Resolution on Tibet moved in Congress

Recognising the plight of the people of Tibet, more than a dozen lawmakers have introduced a resolution in the US House of Representative asking the Chinese Government to respond to the Dalai Lama's initiative to find a lasting solution to the Tibetan issue.

world Updated: Mar 11, 2009 14:22 IST

Recognising the plight of the people of Tibet, more than a dozen lawmakers have introduced a resolution in the US House of Representative asking the Chinese Government to respond to the Dalai Lama's initiative to find a lasting solution to the Tibetan issue.

Introduced in the House of Representative on Monday, the resolution has been sent to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs for necessary action. It calls for a sustained multilateral effort to bring about a durable and peaceful solution to the Tibet issue.

It assumes significance as it was moved on the eve of Chinese Foreign Minister Yang Jiechi's visit to the US. Yang arrived here yesterday and is scheduled to hold talks with senior Obama Administration officials.

The resolution also calls upon China to cease its repression of the Tibetan people, and to lift immediately the harsh policies imposed on Tibetans, including patriotic education campaigns, detention and abuses of those freely expressing political views or relaying news about local conditions.

It also urges Beijing to lift the limitations on travel and communications.

The resolution recognises the Tibetan people for their perseverance in face of hardship and adversity in Tibet and for creating a vibrant and democratic community in exile that sustains the Tibetan identity.

The resolution recognises the Government and people of India for their generosity toward the Tibetan refugee population for the last 50 years.

The law makers urged the Obama Administration to recommit to a sustained effort consistent with the Tibetan Policy Act of 2002, that employs diplomatic, programmatic, and multilateral resources to press the People's Republic of China to respect the Tibetans' identity and the human rights of the Tibetan people.

Referring to a recent State Department report, the resolution said the Chinese authorities continued to commit serious human rights abuses, including torture, arbitrary arrest, extrajudicial detention, and house arrest.

Official repression of freedoms of speech, religion, association, and movement increased significantly following the outbreak of protests across the Tibetan plateau in the spring.

The preservation and development of Tibet's unique religious, cultural, and linguistic heritage continued to be an issue of concern, the resolution said.