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Saudis will lose virginity if women drive: clerics

world Updated: Dec 02, 2011 14:54 IST

ANI
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Allowing women drivers in Saudi Arabia would result in ‘no more virgins’ the country’s highest religious council has warned.

A ‘scientific’ report has alleged that relaxing the ban on women drivers, would also see more Saudis - both men and women - turn to homosexuality and pornography.

The astonishing conclusions were deduced by Muslim scholars at the Majlis al-Ifta’ al-A’ala, Saudi Arabia’s religious council, working in conjunction with Kamal Subhi, a former professor at the King Fahd University.

The scholars, in their report, evaluated the possible impact of repealing the ban in Saudi Arabia, the only country in the world where women are not allowed behind the wheel.

The report was delivered to all the 150 members of the country’s legislative body.

According to the account, allowing women to drive would ‘provoke a surge in prostitution, pornography, homosexuality and divorce’ the Daily Mail reported.

The scholars claimed that within ten years of lifting the ban, there would be ‘no more virgins’ in the Islamic kingdom.

They further corroborated their point of ‘moral decline’ by observing that in other Muslim countries where women are allowed to drive the decline is already visible.

In the report, Professor Subhi, exemplified the point by describing what he experienced while sitting in a coffee shop in an unnamed Arab state.

“All the women were looking at me," he wrote. "One made a gesture that made it clear she was available... this is what happens when women are allowed to drive,” he concluded.

The shocking report came after Shaima Jastaniya, a 34-year-old Saudi woman, was sentenced to 10 lashes with a whip after being caught driving in Jeddah.

Although there have been strong protests across the country about the sentence and law in general, resistance to reform and change remains strong among conservative royals and clerics.