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Syrian unrest raises fears about chemical arsenal

world Updated: Aug 30, 2011 01:07 IST

In 2008, a secret State Department cable warned of a growing chemical weapons threat from a West Asian country whose autocratic leader had a long history of stirring up trouble in the region.

The leader, noted for his "support for terrorist organisations," was attempting to buy technology from other countries to upgrade an already fearsome stockpile of deadly poisons, the department warned.

The Middle Eastern state with the dangerous chemicals was not Libya, whose modest stockpile was thrust into the spotlight last week because of fighting there.

It was Syria, another violence-torn Arab state whose advanced weapons are drawing new concern as the country drifts toward an uncertain future.http://www.hindustantimes.com/images/HTPopups/300811/30_08_11_pg17c.jpg

A sudden collapse of the government of Syrian president Bashar al-Assad could mean a breakdown in controls over the country's weapons, U.S. officials and weapons experts said in interviews. But while Libya's chemical arsenal consists of unwieldy canisters filled mostly with mustard gas, the World War I-era blistering agent, Syria possesses some of the deadliest chemicals ever to be weaponised, dispersed in thousands of artillery shells and warheads that are easy to transport.

Syria's preferred poison is not mustard gas but sarin, the nerve agent that killed 13 people and sickened about 1,000 during a terrorist attack on the Tokyo subway system in 1995. Sarin, which is lethal if inhaled even in minute quantities, can also be used to contaminate water and food supplies.

Although many analysts doubt that Assad would deliberately share chemical bombs with terrorists, it is not inconceivable that weapons could vanish amid the chaos of an uprising that destroys Syria's vaunted security services, which safeguard the munitions.

In collaboration with The Washington Post