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UNSC to adopt draft on Iran with no new sanctions

The UN Security Council was to adopt later today a revised draft resolution containing no new sanctions on Iran for its nuclear defiance and merely reaffirming existing ones.

world Updated: Sep 28, 2008 01:35 IST

The UN Security Council was to adopt later today a revised draft resolution containing no new sanctions on Iran for its nuclear defiance and merely reaffirming existing ones.

Council diplomats told reporters after a closed-door meeting that the text would be adopted at a meeting scheduled to start at 2000 GMT.

At the request of Indonesia, the text, agreed by foreign ministers of the five permanent members of the Security Council -- Britain, China, France, Russia and the United States -- plus Germany yesterday, was slightly amended to welcome "continuing efforts to resolve this matter through negotiation."

The draft would also call on Iran "to fully comply and without delay with its obligations (under relevant UN resolutions) and to meet the requirement of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) board of governors."

Indonesian Ambassador Marty Natalegawa, who abstained when the last Iran sanctions resolution was adopted last March, also secured agreement from insertion of a paragraph in the draft reaffirming the council's "commitment to an early negotiated solution to the Iranian nuclear issue."

The text would also welcome the six powers's "dual-track approach" to the issue, meaning dialogue backed by continuing pressure through sanctions.

British Foreign Secretary David Miliband, speaking here after a ministerial session on Myanmar, said the resolution sends "a very particular signal that our resolve has not weakened."

He added that the draft also sends the message that "the two-track policy of engagement but also sanctions in the face of Iranian defiance of the UN and the IAEA remains very much in play.