US warship sails near Chinese-claimed reef in South China Sea

  • Reuters, Beijing/Hong Kong
  • Updated: May 10, 2016 18:04 IST
Chinese dredging vessels are purportedly seen in waters around Fiery Cross Reef in the disputed Spratly Islands in the South China Sea in this still image from video taken by a P-8A Poseidon surveillance aircraft provided by the US Navy. (Reuters)

A US warship sailed close to a disputed reef in the South China Sea on Tuesday, a US Department of Defense official said, prompting anger in Beijing which denounced the patrol as illegal and a threat to peace and stability.

Guided missile destroyer USS William P Lawrence travelled within 12 nautical miles of Chinese-occupied Fiery Cross Reef, defence department spokesman Bill Urban said.

The so-called freedom of navigation operation was undertaken to “challenge excessive maritime claims” by China, Taiwan, and Vietnam which were seeking to restrict navigation rights in the South China Sea, he said.

“These excessive maritime claims are inconsistent with international law as reflected in the Law of the Sea Convention in that they purport to restrict the navigation rights that the United States and all states are entitled to exercise,” Urban said in an emailed statement.

Beijing and Washington have traded accusations that the other is militarising the South China Sea as China undertakes large-scale land reclamations and construction on disputed features while the US has increased its patrols and exercises in the region.

Facilities on Fiery Cross Reef include a 3,000-metre runway and Washington is concerned China will use it to press its extensive territorial claims at the expense of weaker rivals.

Chinese foreign ministry spokesman Lu Kang said the US ship illegally entered Chinese waters and was tracked and warned. “This action by the US side threatened China’s sovereignty and security interests, endangered the staff and facilities on the reef, and damaged regional peace and stability,” he told a daily news briefing.

Sensitive area

China claims most of the South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan and Brunei have overlapping claims.

The Pentagon last month called on China to reaffirm it has no plans to deploy military aircraft in the disputed Spratly Islands after Beijing used a military plane to evacuate sick workers from Fiery Cross.

“Fiery Cross is sensitive because it is presumed to be the future hub of Chinese military operations in the South China Sea, given its already extensive infrastructure, including its large and deep port and 3000-metre runway,” said Ian Storey, a South China Sea expert at Singapore’s ISEAS Yusof Ishak Institute.

“The timing is interesting, too. It is a show of US determination ahead of President Obama’s trip to Vietnam later this month,” Storey added.

Speaking in Hanoi ahead of Obama’s visit, Daniel Russel, the assistant secretary of state for East Asia and the Pacific, said freedom of navigation operations were important for smaller nations.

“If the world’s most powerful navy cannot sail where international law permits, then what happens to the ships of navy of smaller countries?” Russel told reporters before news of the operation was made public.

“If our warships can’t exercise its legitimate rights under international law at sea, then what about the fishermen, what about the cargo ships? How will they prevent themselves from being blocked by stronger nations?”

China has reacted with anger to previous US freedom of navigation operations, including the overflight of fighter planes near the disputed Scarborough Shoal last month, and when long-range U bombers flew near Chinese facilities under construction on Cuarteron Reef in the Spratlys last November.

US naval officials believe China has plans to start reclamation and construction activities on Scarborough Shoal, which sits further north of the Spratlys within the Philippines claimed 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone.

The move also comes as tough-talking city mayor Rodrigo Duterte looks set to take the Philippines’ presidency. He has proposed multilateral talks on the South China Sea.

also read

Sharif responsible if ‘third-force’ steps in Pakistan: Imran Khan
Show comments