Vegas raid on Jackson doctor sought homicide evidence | world | Hindustan Times
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Vegas raid on Jackson doctor sought homicide evidence

Investigators who raided the Las Vegas home and office of Michael Jackson’s doctor Conrad Murray were seeking evidence of manslaughter, an unsealed search warrant revealed Thursday.

world Updated: Jul 31, 2009 09:27 IST

Investigators who raided the Las Vegas home and office of Michael Jackson’s doctor Conrad Murray were seeking evidence of manslaughter, an unsealed search warrant revealed Thursday.

Federal agents and police were also hunting for possible evidence of unprofessional conduct, “prescribing or treating an addict”, excessive prescribing and evidence of prescriptions of propofol, the warrant showed.

The 13-page document shed more light on the direction of the probe by referencing manslaughter charges and allowing for a search for records related to “shipping orders, distribution lists, use records relating to the purchase, transfer, receiving, ordering, delivery and storage of propofol.”

It also made public 19 possible aliases used by Jackson and his doctors, one of which was Prince Jackson, the name of the pop star’s two sons.

The documents show Clark County District Judge Timothy Williams authorized the searches, in which officers seized computer equipment, a phone message book, a CD with the name of Omar Arnold, an alias Jackson commonly used.
Cellphone records and an iPhone were also taken.

There is also indication that authorities may be probing other doctors as well as AEG, the entertainment conglomerate that was to begin staging Jackson’s comeback concert series in London this summer.

According to the warrant, officers were permitted to seize Jackson-related communications between Murray and officials at AEG as well as several other doctors and nurses associated with the star.

Las Vegas police were required by the warrant to turn over any materials to the Los Angeles investigators.

The warrant indicates that officers sought “prescriptions, patient profiles, medications and correspondence, notations, logs, journals, books, records and documents noting price, quantity, and/or times when prescribed medications were administered, prescribes, obtained, transferred, sold, distributed and/or concealed to” Jackson or any of the aliases.

It also allowed police to seize billing information, laboratory tests, medical files, progress notes, treatment plans and physical examination histories.

Police searched a rented storage space in Las Vegas on Tuesday but removed nothing from it, according to the documents.