When the busy Curiosity rover clicks a selfie on Mars | world | Hindustan Times
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When the busy Curiosity rover clicks a selfie on Mars

The Curiosity Mars' selfie is a combination of several component images taken by Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) while drilling a sample rock target "Buckskin" on lower Mount Sharp.

world Updated: Aug 20, 2015 19:47 IST
HT Correspondent
This low-angle self-portrait of Nasa's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called
This low-angle self-portrait of Nasa's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called "Buckskin" on lower Mount Sharp. (Photo source: Nasa)

Nasa's Curiosity Mars rover took a break from its busy schedule and managed to click a selfie on 'the red planet'. The rover is on a mission to investigate the geology of Mars.

While drilling a sample rock target "Buckskin" on lower Mount Sharp, the rover used a camera on its robotic arm to click multiple images at the drilling site. The selfie is a combination of these several component images taken by Curiosity's Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) on August 5 - its 1,065th Martian day (Sol) on the planet. MAHLI was built by Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego.

"After investigating a geological contact zone and rocks that are unexpectedly high in silica and hydrogen for several weeks, the Mars Curiosity is now driving towards southwest. The hydrogen indicates water bound to minerals in the ground", Nasa said on the rover's future course on the planet.

The rover's wheels are about 20 inches or 50cm in diameter and about 16 inches or 40cm wide. Also, a close look reveals a small rock stuck in the rover's left middle wheel, which the Nasa said they had also seen about three weeks ago.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has designed and built the Curiosity rover, which is also managing the Mars Science Laboratory Project.

The rover finished activities in Marias Pass on August 12 and headed onward up Mount Sharp, the layered mountain it reached in September 2014.