Without India, China and Brazil no success on climate change: US | world | Hindustan Times
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Without India, China and Brazil no success on climate change: US

Without the active participation of key countries like India, China, Brazil on negotiations and they sharing the responsibilities with the developed world, there can be no success on climate change, the White House has said.

world Updated: Oct 10, 2009 07:48 IST

Without the active participation of key countries like India, China, Brazil on negotiations and they sharing the responsibilities with the developed world, there can be no success on climate change, the White House has said.

"I think it's important for the world to understand that the United States is taking, granted, long overdue but important steps to ensuring that we're part of that solution," the White House press secretary, Robert Gibbs, said at his daily press conference.

"But I think as the President said earlier today, the problems that he outlined and the challenges that we have are not going to be solved by one man, they're not going to be solved by one nation, unless or until other developing nations -- the Chinese, the Indians, the Brazilians also come to that larger table with solutions that are not just voluntary but that embody, again, international collective action to address that issue," Gibbs said in response to a question.

In his Rose Garden White House speech hours after he was awarded with the Noble Peace Prize for the year 2009, Obama said all nations must now accept their share of responsibility for transforming the way that energy is used.

"We cannot accept the growing threat posed by climate change, which could forever damage the world that we pass on to our children, sowing conflict and famine, destroying coastlines and emptying cities," the US President said.

"Obviously the President has promised and staked his belief that it is important to do this, and we will continue to work on it through the end of the year. If it happens, we'd certainly be proud to do that and go to Copenhagen with it," Gibbs said.