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World's tallest tower reopens deck

The 124th floor observation deck at the world's tallest tower Burj Khalifa was thrown open today for public again, two months after a faulty lift forced its closure depriving visitors of the panoramic view.

world Updated: Apr 04, 2010 20:29 IST

The 124th floor observation deck at the world's tallest tower Burj Khalifa was thrown open today for public again, two months after a faulty lift forced its closure depriving visitors of the panoramic view.

The deck, also called 'At the Top', was closed for public on February 7 after reports of a faulty lift and Emaar, the company that developed the project, said it was for 'maintenance' reasons.

The 828 metre skyscraper, however, is now open for business and new bookings.

Meanwhile, the tallest tower has also announced that it is tapping solar power to meet a bulk of the water heating requirements of its residents.

Burj Khalifa uses solar panels to heat 140,000 litres of water every day, which will be distributed to homes and commercial entities within the tower.

The solar powered water brings energy savings equivalent to 3,200 kilo watts per day and 690MWh of energy per annum, it was announced today.

Ahmad Al Matrooshi, Managing Director – UAE, Emaar Properties, said the energy efficient measures, especially through use of renewable sources, are not an option but an imperative for sustainable growth.

"By leveraging solar power, Burj Khalifa is setting an example as well as creating a referral mark on how urban developments can effectively integrate energy-friendly initiatives," he added.

"The significant benefits include cost savings on energy uses – not only for the tower but the Government utility provider too – as well as reduced pollution levels leading to a healthier environment," said John Owen of SOLE UAE Solar Systems.

The solar panels of Burj Khalifa serve as solar collectors, as against photovoltaic electricity generation technology.

Located on roof of The Offices, the annexure of Burj Khalifa, 378 collector panels, each 2.7 sq m in area, can heat the entire 140,000 litres of water in approximately 7 hours of day time solar radiation.

Among other key sustainable energy and water use measures, the condensate from all the air-conditioning equipment in Burj Khalifa is reclaimed to cool the potable water from Dubai Electricity & Water Authority (DEWA).

The condensate is then collected in an on-site irrigation tank and used for tower's landscaping. When operational, this system will provide about 15 million gallons of supplemental water per year.

Within the confines of Burj Khalifa's architectural design – that of a tall building with a fully glazed facade and little solar shading - a concerted effort has been made in the design and construction to make it environment-friendly.