Supriya Sharma

Supriya Sharma

Supriya Sharma writes on books and curates and edits lifestyle stories for hindustantimes.com

Articles by Supriya Sharma
British novelist Lisa Hilton’s erotic thriller Maestra will soon be made into a TV series.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
British novelist Lisa Hilton’s erotic thriller Maestra will soon be made into a TV series.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

I find it exciting that a lot of people hate my book: British novelist Lisa Hilton

Hindustan Times, New Delhi | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JUN 13, 2017 10:36 AM IST
Lisa Hilton, author of 2016’s erotic thriller Maestra, is back with Domina. Here, she talks about the inspiration behind her sociopathic heroine, Maestra as a TV series and more.
The God of Small Things is set in Kerala of the 1960s and is about a Syrian Christian family.(Arundhati Roy’s photo courtesy Mayank Austen Soofi)
The God of Small Things is set in Kerala of the 1960s and is about a Syrian Christian family.(Arundhati Roy’s photo courtesy Mayank Austen Soofi)

HT podcast: 20 years of Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, New Delhi
UPDATED ON JUL 12, 2019 03:12 PM IST
Welcome to SoundRead, the books podcast of Hindustan Times, where we discuss issues and news on books, publishing and the world at large.
An ancient banyan tree in Jhabua, Madhya Pradesh.(HT Photo)
An ancient banyan tree in Jhabua, Madhya Pradesh.(HT Photo)

Review: How I Became a Tree by Sumana Roy

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAY 20, 2017 08:26 AM IST
A rare meditation on the plant world that meanders through history, religious philosophy, botanical research, literature, cinema, folklore and mythology
A widow at a shelter in Vrindavan.(AFP)
A widow at a shelter in Vrindavan.(AFP)

Review of The Poison of Love: A tale of the mythified emotion of love by KR Meera

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAY 13, 2017 08:17 AM IST
KR Meera’s new novel, The Poison of Love, is a cautionary tale about the much abused and mythified emotion of love.

In the realm of the bizarre: Book review of Divya Dubey’s Turtle Dove

New Delhi | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON APR 04, 2017 07:37 PM IST
The stories in this collection are unusual in their choice of themes, touching upon a variety of subjects discomforting for polite society — incest, child sexual abuse, homosexuality, toxic friendships and relatives
Hindustani classical vocalist Pandit Jasraj performing at a music festival in Delhi.(Courtesy: Shriram Bharatiya Kala Kendra)
Hindustani classical vocalist Pandit Jasraj performing at a music festival in Delhi.(Courtesy: Shriram Bharatiya Kala Kendra)

Pandit Jasraj on his life-long love for music

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON APR 01, 2017 07:27 AM IST
The acclaimed classical vocalist will perform this weekend at one of India’s oldest music festivals.
Artiste and filmmaker Muzaffar Ali in New Delhi. The 72-year-old is the curator of Jahan-e-Khusrau, a Sufi music festival that he started in 2001. It returns to Delhi for its 12th edition this weekend.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Artiste and filmmaker Muzaffar Ali in New Delhi. The 72-year-old is the curator of Jahan-e-Khusrau, a Sufi music festival that he started in 2001. It returns to Delhi for its 12th edition this weekend.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Would like to cast Alia Bhatt as Zooni if I remake it today: Muzaffar Ali

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAR 25, 2017 09:07 AM IST
Muzaffar Ali, founder of Delhi’s biggest Sufi festival, reminisces on Zooni, his muses and the relevance of Sufism amid a “hardening of hearts”.
Home Shrine (detail), 2016, by Manisha Parekh, is her interpretation of the sacred as a private space. The art work is part of an ongoing exhibition that reflects on the legacy of the holy cities of Varanasi and Anuradhapura.(Raj K Raj/HT Photo)
Home Shrine (detail), 2016, by Manisha Parekh, is her interpretation of the sacred as a private space. The art work is part of an ongoing exhibition that reflects on the legacy of the holy cities of Varanasi and Anuradhapura.(Raj K Raj/HT Photo)

Secular and sacred: A tale of two cities

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAR 18, 2017 07:19 AM IST
An ongoing exhibition in Delhi reflects on the past and present of two ancient, holy cities that have been sites of faith and conflict.
A photograph of Frida Kahlo (Neha Dhupia), archival pigment print, 2011, from the series Frida Kahlo.(Rohit Chawla/Courtesy Tasveer)
A photograph of Frida Kahlo (Neha Dhupia), archival pigment print, 2011, from the series Frida Kahlo.(Rohit Chawla/Courtesy Tasveer)

When Neha Dhupia became Frida Kahlo and Chitrangada Singh The Lady in Gold

New Delhi | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAR 10, 2017 05:38 PM IST
Fashion photographer Rohit Chawla’s reconstructions of some famous works by Raja Ravi Varma, Gustav Klimt and Frida Kahlo are on display at an ongoing exhibition in Delhi.
Kaali Nadakam, one of the plays staged at Meta 2017. It explores caste relations and ideas of power and justice through a murder that takes place during the performance of a traditional temple play.(Photos courtesy: Teamwork Arts)
Kaali Nadakam, one of the plays staged at Meta 2017. It explores caste relations and ideas of power and justice through a murder that takes place during the performance of a traditional temple play.(Photos courtesy: Teamwork Arts)

Staging diversity: Meta 2017 will make you reflect deeper on nuances of social issues

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON MAR 04, 2017 08:58 AM IST
From censorship to Shakespeare for clowns

Forget Oscars, how many of these Indian book-to-film adaptations have you seen?

New Delhi | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 26, 2017 01:00 PM IST
Five out of nine Best Film nominees at the Oscars 2017 are book adaptations. We list 10 of the best Indian films that were based on books. How many of these have you seen, or read?
L-R: Politician Shashi Tharoor, filmmaker Muzzafar Ali and poet Ashok Vajpeyi at the literary festival, ‘Meer Ki Delhi: Words in the garden’, in Delhi. The two-day event is inspired by renowned Urdu poet Meer.(Raj K Raj/HT Photo)
L-R: Politician Shashi Tharoor, filmmaker Muzzafar Ali and poet Ashok Vajpeyi at the literary festival, ‘Meer Ki Delhi: Words in the garden’, in Delhi. The two-day event is inspired by renowned Urdu poet Meer.(Raj K Raj/HT Photo)

Meer Ki Delhi: Celebrating Delhi’s very own Meer Taqi Meer, Khayal music and Urdu

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 25, 2017 08:57 AM IST
A two-day festival of literature and ideas celebrates Urdu poet Meer Taqi Meer and his beloved city, Delhi.
Poet, lyricist and film director Gulzar with Sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan at the inaugural session of Jashn e Rekhta 2017 at the IGNCA , New Delhi(Vipin Kumar/HT photo)
Poet, lyricist and film director Gulzar with Sarod maestro Amjad Ali Khan at the inaugural session of Jashn e Rekhta 2017 at the IGNCA , New Delhi(Vipin Kumar/HT photo)

Urdu festival Jashn-e-Rekhta begins in Delhi

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 18, 2017 06:17 PM IST
The Urdu festival Jashn-e-Rekhta is back to celebrate the language, its literature and culture in all its richness and variety
English novelist George Orwell’s novel 1984 topped Amazon.com’s bestsellers list last week after US President Trump’s advisor Kellyanne Conway famously offered “alternative facts” in a TV interview.
English novelist George Orwell’s novel 1984 topped Amazon.com’s bestsellers list last week after US President Trump’s advisor Kellyanne Conway famously offered “alternative facts” in a TV interview.

HT podcast: On why there’s a resurgence of interest in dystopian fiction

New Delhi | By Manjula Narayan and Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 10, 2017 03:16 PM IST
Welcome to SoundRead, the books podcast of Hindustan Times, where we discuss issues and news from the world of books and publishing every week.
On 1st January, 2000, a bar girl lights some incense to bring good luck and fortune to the go-go bar where she works.(LightRocket via Getty Images)
On 1st January, 2000, a bar girl lights some incense to bring good luck and fortune to the go-go bar where she works.(LightRocket via Getty Images)

Review: Neon Noon by Tanuj Solanki

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2017 11:13 PM IST
Tanuj Solanki’s debut novel is an account of coming to terms with one of the oldest afflictions known to humankind – heartbreak
Panchali Ki Shapath, a Hindi play, uses Draupadi’s public humiliation to address violence against women. It’s one of several plays to retell epics with a modern message.(Photo courtesy: Rangrayog)
Panchali Ki Shapath, a Hindi play, uses Draupadi’s public humiliation to address violence against women. It’s one of several plays to retell epics with a modern message.(Photo courtesy: Rangrayog)

Rang Mahotsav: retelling epics for the modern age

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON FEB 03, 2017 09:25 PM IST
From solo acts to dance dramas to folk theatre, there’s something for everyone at this 21-day-long theatre festival.
A Close Up View, 2009: Watercolour on paper. Gajwani’s work creates an effect that evokes memories and emotions, unique to each onlooker
A Close Up View, 2009: Watercolour on paper. Gajwani’s work creates an effect that evokes memories and emotions, unique to each onlooker

A love affair with abstracts: Gopi Gajwani’s solo show

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JAN 28, 2017 07:50 AM IST
Artist Gopi Gajwani is back with a solo exhibition, his first in a decade, which carries forward his life-long romance with abstracts.
Kate Tempest performs her latest album Let them Eat Chaos at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 on Thursday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Kate Tempest performs her latest album Let them Eat Chaos at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 on Thursday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Let Them Eat Chaos: Kate Tempest fills the void on the last day of JLF 2017

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JAN 23, 2017 08:08 PM IST
The audience roared its applause after Costa award winning British poet-playwright Kate Tempest’s performance
Author Tabish Khair (2R) during the session, Being the Other, at the Jaipur Literature Festival on Monday.(Prabhakar Sharma/HT Photo)
Author Tabish Khair (2R) during the session, Being the Other, at the Jaipur Literature Festival on Monday.(Prabhakar Sharma/HT Photo)

JLF 2017: Jihad doesn’t mean you chop people’s heads off, says Tabish Khair

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JAN 23, 2017 08:19 PM IST
Violence — personal and political — formed the subject of a session on the last day of the Jaipur Literature Festival where Tabish Khair and Manju Kapur discussed their recent novels.
“We’re part of the film industry and in that if people who are creators don’t care about poetry and music, and go about with a ‘jo bikta hai woh tikta hai’ attitude, then that would be great injustice to the art form,” says poet-lyricist Prasoon Joshi.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
“We’re part of the film industry and in that if people who are creators don’t care about poetry and music, and go about with a ‘jo bikta hai woh tikta hai’ attitude, then that would be great injustice to the art form,” says poet-lyricist Prasoon Joshi.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Not a single album in 2016 was a complete one: Prasooon Joshi at JLF 2016

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 23, 2017 04:53 PM IST
Poet-lyricist Prasoon Joshi on his childhood spent in libraries, why the Indian education system needs overhauling and the new web series he’s co-producing with Neerja director Ram Madhvani.
The first Indian dinosaur, Titanosaur, was discovered in 1828, but it took almost 50 years for it to be given a name. “The word dinosaur was coined 12 years after remains of Titanosaurus was discovered in India,” said biochemist Pranay Lal during a session with naturalist Pradip Krishen and British palaeontologist Richard Fortey.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
The first Indian dinosaur, Titanosaur, was discovered in 1828, but it took almost 50 years for it to be given a name. “The word dinosaur was coined 12 years after remains of Titanosaurus was discovered in India,” said biochemist Pranay Lal during a session with naturalist Pradip Krishen and British palaeontologist Richard Fortey.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Pranay Lal: India has not marketed or preserved its discoveries on dinosaurs

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 23, 2017 04:29 PM IST
The first Indian dinosaur, Titanosaur, was discovered in 1828, but it took almost 50 years for it to be given a name. “The word dinosaur was coined 12 years after remains of Titanosaurus was discovered in India,” revealed biochemist Pranay Lal during a session at the Jaipur Literature Festival.
Kannada writer Vivek Shanbhag’s Ghachar Ghochar was among the most popular books to be published last year.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Kannada writer Vivek Shanbhag’s Ghachar Ghochar was among the most popular books to be published last year.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Many things come together for a story to be born: Vivek Shanbhag on Ghachar Ghochar

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 23, 2017 02:30 PM IST
Kannada writer Vivek Shanbagh has been writing for over three decades now. His first story was published when he was only 17, and his first collection came out five years later. He talks to HT about his novella, inspirations and how difficult it is to write alongside a full-time job.
Poet-lyricist Prasoon Joshi poses for HT at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 in Jaipur.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Poet-lyricist Prasoon Joshi poses for HT at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 in Jaipur.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

I am ashamed by the kind of songs that are written today: Prasoon Joshi at JLF

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 22, 2017 06:42 PM IST
It is a testimony to his popularity that lyricist Prasoon Joshi had a hard time entering the rather small Samvad venue at Diggi Palace for his session Ideate: Freedom to Dream at the Jaipur Literature Festival. The adoring crowds were duly rewarded with the Padma Shri-awardee reciting some of his verses and singing his popular songs.
British political expert Emma Sky during the session Writing the self : The Art of Memoir at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 on Sunday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
British political expert Emma Sky during the session Writing the self : The Art of Memoir at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 on Sunday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

You don’t want to lose friends over a book: British author Emma Sky at JLF 2017

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 22, 2017 05:44 PM IST
At a session on memoir writing at the Jaipur Literature Festival 2017, four authors -- who’ve written on subjects as varied as travel, volunteering in a war-ravaged country, escaping a dictatorship and erotica -- shared the challenges of writing about the self.
British journalist and author Bee Rowlatt helped an academic Mary Witwit escape Iraq when her colleagues were being beheaded after the invasion of the country.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
British journalist and author Bee Rowlatt helped an academic Mary Witwit escape Iraq when her colleagues were being beheaded after the invasion of the country.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

Women face unequal scrutiny of their private lives: Bee Rowlatt at JLF 2017

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 21, 2017 08:20 PM IST
British journalist and author Bee Rowlatt said feminism in India is breathtaking during a session titled In Search of Mary during the Jaipur Literature Festival in Jaipur on Saturday.
“His (Donald Trump’s) instability, trigger-happiness, and willingness to set the US against the world means the period of long peace is set to end. We may return to a world where conflict between states might return,” said historian David Armitage.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
“His (Donald Trump’s) instability, trigger-happiness, and willingness to set the US against the world means the period of long peace is set to end. We may return to a world where conflict between states might return,” said historian David Armitage.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

David Armitage at JLF 2017: US president’s instability could end peace since WWII

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 22, 2017 10:51 AM IST
The swearing-in of Donald Trump as America’s 45th President and its possible repercussions formed the background to the session on civil wars at the Jaipur Literature Festival where historian David Armitage walked the audience through the history of internal conflicts.
Vayu Naidu, Arshia Sattar and Volga during session Uttara Kanda: Searching Sita session at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 in Jaipur.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Vayu Naidu, Arshia Sattar and Volga during session Uttara Kanda: Searching Sita session at the Jaipur Literature Fest 2017 in Jaipur.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

JLF 2017: Sita and the exploration of sisterhood

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 21, 2017 05:28 PM IST
A session on the Ramayana at the Jaipur Literature Festival focused on how Valmiki’s Ramayana held out possibilities for multiple retellings.
Feminist writer Volga at the Jaipur Literature Festival on Friday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Feminist writer Volga at the Jaipur Literature Festival on Friday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

The democratic space to disagree is shrinking in India: Telugu writer Volga

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JAN 20, 2017 08:22 PM IST
At JLF 2017, Telugu writer P Lalitha Kumari aka Volga tells HT about her Sahitya Akademi Award winning book The Liberation of Sita , the misconceptions about feminism, and the story behind her intriguing pseudonym.
Actor Rishi Kapoor with Rachel Dwyer at the Jaipur Literature Festival 2017 on Friday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)
Actor Rishi Kapoor with Rachel Dwyer at the Jaipur Literature Festival 2017 on Friday.(Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo)

JLF 2017: Rishi Kapoor discusses his life, career and book Khullam Khulla

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma
UPDATED ON JAN 20, 2017 06:45 PM IST
Actor Rishi Kapoor spoke about his journey in the film industry and his memoir Khullam Khulla on the second day of the ongoing Jaipur Literature Festival.
Poet and filmmaker Gulzar during the inaugural session of Jaipur Literature Festival 2017 in Jaipur on Thursday.(Himanshu Vyas/HT Photo)
Poet and filmmaker Gulzar during the inaugural session of Jaipur Literature Festival 2017 in Jaipur on Thursday.(Himanshu Vyas/HT Photo)

Gulzar at JLF 2017: These poems don’t attack or bite. They only bark

Hindustan Times | By Supriya Sharma, Jaipur
UPDATED ON JAN 21, 2017 03:38 PM IST
At the release of his new collection of poems at the Jaipur Literature Festival, poet-lyricist Gulzar spoke of being the voice of the common man. “If you’re connected to the world around you, what happens in it must affect you in some way,” he said.
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