New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Nov 13, 2019-Wednesday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Wednesday, Nov 13, 2019

CelebsPick: 5 authors pick their favourite biographies

Add these to your reading list and get inspired

brunch Updated: Jul 20, 2019 20:51 IST
Veenu Singh
Veenu Singh
Hindustan Times
Here’s a list of five iconic biographies that will inspire you
Here’s a list of five iconic biographies that will inspire you
         

1. Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye

Hindustantimes

“I’d urge readers towards Andrew Robinson’s rigorously researched, admiring and transparent work, Satyajit Ray: The Inner Eye. It remains an enduring portrait of an artist, a time, a lost world and of the indelible films he passed on to us all.” —Pico Iyer

2. Adi Shankaracharya: Hinduism’s Greatest Thinker

Hindustantimes

“Adi Shankaracharyaji is one of the greatest sages and thinkers of India, and perhaps the world. His thoughts and ideas have influenced Indians for a millennium and more.” —Amish Tripathi

3. Changel: The Biography Of A Village

Hindustantimes

“Arvind N. Das’s underrated, Changel, is the biography of his ancestral village in Bihar. Das went on to be a major sociologist and editor. There are excellent rural autobiographies in other Indian languages, but this one remains unmatched in English.” —Tabish Khair

4. The Lives Of Freda: The political, spiritual and personal journeys of Freda Bedi

Hindustantimes

“This biography is of an unconventional revolutionary, extraordinary in her quest for peace and freedom. The book runs the gamut of Freda’s many lives – as mother, nationalist, activist, social worker, writer and eventually as a Buddhist nun – as she challenges notions of religion, caste and identity.” —Aanchal Malhotra

5. Jahangir: An Intimate Portrait of a Great Mughal

Hindustantimes

“Parvati Sharma’s discursive retelling of the life of Jahangir is thoughtful and psychologically penetrating. It strips away the glamour of the Mughal court to reveal a deftly sketched portrait of Jahangir, in all his hedonism, inquisitiveness, refinement and intelligence.”—William Dalrymple

Follow @VeenuSingh12 on Twitter

From HT Brunch, July 21, 2019

Follow @HTBrunch on Twitter

Connect with us on facebook.com/hindustantimesbrunch