No relief for the poor in govt's flood relief camps | delhi | Hindustan Times
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No relief for the poor in govt's flood relief camps

That the poor have to bear the brunt of nature's fury in Delhi, be it during the current floods or the imminent harsh winters, has been evident recently.

delhi Updated: Sep 13, 2010 00:16 IST
Mallica Joshi

That the poor have to bear the brunt of nature's fury in Delhi, be it during the current floods or the imminent harsh winters, has been evident recently.

Scores of residents of low-lying areas, such as Okhla, Usmanpur and Jaitpur, were evacuated and sent to relief camps, to save them from the rising flood waters.

However, even in the government-run relief camps, the evacuees still have to sleep on drenched mattresses and make do with sub-standard food and healthcare. "The government may have set up camps but the condition here is very bad. Arrangements for adequate food and drinking water are missing," said Munni, 32, evacuated from Usmanpur Village.

The Delhi government has set up 1,000 flood relief camps near Old Yamuna Bridge, Geeta Colony, Shamshanghat, opposite Akshardham temple and Okhla. Currently, more than 4,000 people are residing in these relief camps.

According to civic agencies, adequate arrangements for food and health care have been made at every camp. But people living here tell a different story altogether.

"We don't get adequate food. There are too many people and very little food," said Umesh Kumar, a labourer.

"Many children have already fallen ill and have diarrhoea. The rain is making matters worse," said Gori Bai.

"The toilets are too few and get dirty very quickly," said Devi Chand, a rickshaw puller at the Akshardham Camp.

"We have made arrangements for sanitation, water, food and health care at all 15 camp sites. We have not got any complaints so far," said S.S. Ghonkrokta, Deputy Commissioner (East), Revenue Department.

"An official is present to ensure there is enough drinking water and that sanitation is not compromised," he added.