Postal staff play Santa, dole change at RML hospital | delhi | Hindustan Times
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Postal staff play Santa, dole change at RML hospital

Fifty seven-year-old Kailash Chand Sharma moves around with a purpose inside Ram Manohar Lohia (RML) Hospital’s emergency ward, scouting the beds of all the patients carefully.

delhi Updated: Nov 14, 2016 17:25 IST
Abhinav Rajput
Kailash Chand Sharma offering lower denomination currency notes to patients and their relatives at RML Hospital.
Kailash Chand Sharma offering lower denomination currency notes to patients and their relatives at RML Hospital.(HT Photo)

Fifty seven-year-old Kailash Chand Sharma moves around with a purpose inside Ram Manohar Lohia (RML) Hospital’s emergency ward, scouting the beds of all the patients carefully.

Sharma, with a small group of men in tow, at first look, may come across as a doctor, which he is not. He, however, has been performing an equally important job.

Sharma is offering lower denomination currency notes to patients and their relatives, many of who have not been able to collect cash from any of the overcrowded ATMs in the city.

“Others can wait but they can’t. Therefore, the Gol Dak Khana post office has ordered us to offer money to the patients in need,” said Sharma, the officer in-charge of RML post office.

The team works like a mobile post office. They carry the papers needed for exchange of money and Rs 100 notes. Patients have to fill a form and attach a photocopy of their identity card with it.

“We are giving money on minimum paper work. The maximum cash we give to a patient is Rs 4000,” said Ram Avtar, postal assistant.

Gurvinder Singh, a resident of Paharganj whose relative was critical and admitted at the hospital for past three days said: “Yesterday (on Saturday), when I went to get medicines worth Rs 70, the shopkeeper told me that he does not have change and will return the money only after couple of days. Had the people from the post office not come to our help, it would have been very difficult for us”.

A doctor at the hospital, Dr Rajan, said that the condition at the hospital was such that people were asking for change even from the hospital staff. “How can we give them change when we are facing the same problems,” Rajan said.

A hospital staff on conditions of anonymity said that though there has been no causality in the hospital due to lack of currency notes, things could have been worse if they the post office administration didn’t come to their aid.

“These are testing times and such kinds of initiatives will help us overcome it,” he added.