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Saturday, Aug 24, 2019

DU’s orientation day: Dreams and fears collide

Students across DU colleges were greeted on Saturday with musical performances and encouraging notes by principals and professors. Freshers were also apprised on the history of their colleges, the course structure and syllabus, anti-ragging rules, the internal complaints committees and societies in the respective colleges.

education Updated: Jul 21, 2019 07:32 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
The first year students enjoy on the first day of the new academic session, at Miranda House College, North Campus, in New Delhi, India, on Saturday
The first year students enjoy on the first day of the new academic session, at Miranda House College, North Campus, in New Delhi, India, on Saturday(Sushil Kumar/HT PHOTO)
         

It was 19-year-old Julie Tiwari’s dream to study in Miranda House, and on Saturday, she lived the first day of that dream. Tiwari, a visually challenged student who had enrolled for the BA Programme in the premier Delhi University college, was among the hundreds of students across the varsity attending the orientation programme held on Saturday, the first day of the new academic session.

Dressed in a new teal top, Tiwari — who would liked to be a professor someday — could not suppress her smile while talking about getting through India’s best college — as per the National Institute Ranking Framework (NIRF).

“Though I could not find a tactile path in college, the volunteers and teachers around were very helpful. My seniors have studied here and told me the college has software that helps visually challenged students with studies,” she said.

Students across DU colleges were greeted on Saturday with musical performances and encouraging notes by principals and professors. Freshers were also apprised on the history of their colleges, the course structure and syllabus, anti-ragging rules, the internal complaints committees and societies in the respective colleges.

While Ramjas, Hindu, Venkateswara and Miranda House held their orientations on Saturday, several other colleges like Shri Ram College of Commerce and Rajdhani College organised it a day earlier. Lady Shri Ram will hold it orientation programme on Monday.

Of the 62,000 undergraduate seats in Delhi, there have been xxx admissions so far.

For Samaksh Dhorta, a civil services aspirant pursuing BA (Hons) in Political Science from Ramjas College, the difficulties lie elsewhere. “I am not too worried about adjusting to a change in lifestyle, but the challenge will be to not miss home,” he said, smiling.

Apart from posters and banners welcoming the freshers, college walls also adorned pamphlets advertising accommodation options and other services. Several students HT spoke to said that though they were excited about being a part of DU, but like Dhorta, had concerns that spread beyond getting admitted to the university.

“I had to discontinue my studies last year because of financial constraints. My father, who was in the cold storage business, had to turn to farming and there was not enough for our sustenance,” said Aastha Sarraf, a resident of Anand Nagar in Gorakhpur, who took admission in BSc (Hons) in Mathematics in Miranda House this year after scoring 96.25% in her board examination.

Sarraf, a former student of Welham Girls’ School in Dehradun, said she could not afford to stay outside campus. “We can barely manage even the hostel and college fee. Staying off campus would mean additional travel and food expense,” she said, adding that she was unsure if she could pursue her education if she failed to secure a hostel seat.

Not only Sarraf, several other female students are hoping to get through hostels in order to avail cheaper and safer accommodation options. “Hindu College was my first choice since it is one of the best in the country. I needed to experience a co-educational college because studying in an all-girls college might not prepare me for life after college,” said Komal Katvia, adding that she is hoping to secure a hostel berth. Till then, she will be commuting from her home in Bhiwadi to college — an over 70-km journey.

Apart from welcoming new students, colleges were also busy admitting students under the fifth cut-off list. Jennifer Khaidem, 18, was among those students who took admission for BA (Hons) in History in Ramjas College. “Though I had taken admission in Indraprastha College for Women, I changed my mind because Ramjas is in North Campus. I chose history because it will help me pursue the civil services and work towards upliftment my state — Manipur,” she said.

First Published: Jul 21, 2019 07:22 IST

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