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Home / Education / Few Andhra Board students benefit from one-day extension for DU admission

Few Andhra Board students benefit from one-day extension for DU admission

On Monday, a day after the AP government wrote to the DU urging it to consider the newly released marks of state board students for admissions, the varsity relayed the information personally to college principals but did not issue a public notice or circular.

education Updated: Jul 03, 2019 10:02 IST
HT Correspondent
HT Correspondent
Hindustan Times, New Delhi
(Sushil Kumar/HT PHOTO)

The Delhi University’s (DU) late night announcement on Monday, giving students from Andhra Pradesh (AP) an extra day to enroll in its colleges, meant very few students from the state could benefit from the extension. On Tuesday, only a handful of AP students turned up for admissions to DU colleges.

On Monday, a day after the AP government wrote to the DU urging it to consider the newly released marks of state board students for admissions, the varsity relayed the information personally to college principals but did not issue a public notice or circular.

Prathyush Gunda of AIKYATHA—a group of students from Andhra Pradesh—said that the University did not release any public notice and hence a lot of students were unaware of the extension. “The colleges were also informed late on Monday night. How can we expect more students to turn up without any information,” he said.

The extension was granted in light of the grading system introduced for class 12 state board exams as the DU only considers absolute percentage for admissions. This forced the university’s admission committee to convert the grades to percentage by taking a mean score, as per the CBSE rules. However, as a result of this conversion, no student from the AP board could obtain more than 95%—the cut-off for all popular courses in DU—prompting the Andhra Pradesh government to intervene. But the intervention further compounded students’ problems. When the AP board released the actual score, the overall percentage of many students slid by 2%-3% making them ineligible for admission to all the popular DU colleges.

For instance, in the Shri Ram College of Commerce (SRCC), four Andhra board students had enrolled in Economics (Hons) and six in BCom (Hons) on the basis of marks converted by the University board (95%). But their actual percentage, released later, does not match the required percentage. “Now, only one student from Andhra Pradesh state board is eligible for BA (Hons) in Economics; all Andhra Pradesh state board admissions to BCom (Hons) were cancelled after the students failed to meet the cut-off,” said an official in the college’s admission committee.

Among those whose admissions were cancelled, was Vijay Babu, a resident of Godavari, who had initially received admission to BCom (Hons) at SRCC. “When the university converted our grades into marks I was eligible for the course at SRCC. But, after the state board released my actual marks, my percentage slid to 91%. The college cancelled my admission on Tuesday and asked me to enroll in the second cut-off. I will also have to pay ₹1,000 cancellation fee,” Babu saidz.

At the Miranda House and the Hindu College, very few Andhra Board students enrolled for the second cut-off on Tuesday. “Only one student from the board enrolled on Tuesday,” Miranda House principal Bijyalaxmi Nanda said.

While three Andhra board students enrolled in the Ramjas College on Tuesday, admission of one student was cancelled after his aggregate slid.

Visakhapatnam resident Vamsi Krishna was among the few whose percentage increased after his actual marks were taken into account. “Earlier, I was getting 95%, but when I got my actual marks, I saw I had scored 96%,” said Vamsi, who took admission in Hansraj College.

Meanwhile, colleges also allowed admission to CISCE board students, who were declined admission over confusion of subject names.