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4,538 kg biomedical waste produced daily

Officials say this amount can be attributed to the concentration of large-scale healthcare facilities in the city, which is known as a hub of medical tourism.

gurgaon Updated: Jun 14, 2019 03:44 IST
Prayag Arora-Desai
Prayag Arora-Desai
Hindustan Times, Gurugram
biomedical waste,medical waste gurgaon,HSPCB
Patients wait near a pile of hazardous bio-medical waste at the Kalawati Saran Hospital . ((Saumya Khandelwal/HT Photo))

The city generates an average of 4,538 kilogrammes of hazardous biomedical waste per day, amounting to about 1,600 metric tonnes per year, according to the Haryana State Pollution Control Board (HSPCB) data. Officials say this amount can be attributed to the concentration of large-scale healthcare facilities in the city, which is known as a hub of medical tourism.

However, officials also said that the collection and disposal of biomedical waste in the city is being managed effectively. “We have not had to issue a single penalty for violation of the MoEF’s Biomedical Waste Management Rules in the last three years,” said Kuldeep Singh, regional officer, HSPCB.

In accordance with the Biomedical Waste Management Rules, all hospitals and medical establishments are allowed to generate about 2 to 2.5 kilogrammes of waste per bed per day. “Of this, about 90% is general waste, while about 10% is hazardous biomedical waste,” said Manish Rathi, deputy medical superintendent, Civil Hospital, Gurugram. The 10% is then segregated into three categories. The ‘Yellow’ category collects anatomical waste, the ‘Blue’ category refers to surgical tools and needles, while the ‘Red’ category refers to plastics, such as syringes and IV packs, among others.

Rathi said that there is daily collection of the segregated hazardous waste by the HSPCB’s concessionaire, which operates a bio-medical waste treatment and disposal facility in Sector 37.

Activists, however, have cautioned against the increase of the city’s medical waste. “Given Gurugram’s reputation as a medical tourism hub, we need to be future ready,” said Aseem Takyar, a local activist.

Vikas Gehlot, spokesperson, HSPCB’s concessionaire said, “Many private clinics don’t provide us with their waste. We do not know what they do with their waste.” 

First Published: Jun 14, 2019 03:44 IST

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