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Gurugram district admin yet to identify bulk waste generators in city

Departments were asked to identify bulk solid waste generators and identify places for disposal. departments claimed the matter was the mcg’s responsibility

gurgaon Updated: Jun 10, 2019 08:20 IST
Archana Mishra
Archana Mishra
Hindustan Times, Gurugram
garbage,landfill,pollution
On April 24, in a meeting convened by Amit Khatri, strict instructions were given to ensure compliance with the SWM rules. These departments were instructed to segregate waste on-site and have their own composting units.(Parveen Kumar/Hindustan Times)

Ahead of the first quarterly report to be submitted by the state on compliance of the Solid Waste Management Rules, 2016 (SWM), at the National Green Tribunal court on June 30, the district administration is yet to identify overall bulk waste generators that produce more than 100kg waste a day.

In a letter dated May 10, sent by the district administration to the Haryana Shahari Vikas Pradhikaran (HSVP), Haryana State Industrial and Infrastructure Development Corporation (HSIIDC), the town and country planning department, and District Development and Panchayat Office, departments were asked to identify bulk solid waste generators and identify places for disposal of the waste.

When HT contacted the departments, they claimed the matter was the sole responsibility of the Municipal Corporation of Gurugram (MCG). Sudhir Chauhan, senior district town planner, town and country planning, said, “We don’t have enough bulk waste generators that are producing more than 100kg of waste. There is no data as such.”

Chandra Shekhar, chief administrator, HSVP said, “It comes under the MCG’s jurisdiction.”

A bulk waste generator is any commercial or public entity that generates 100kg and more waste per day. It includes hotels, restaurant, malls, shopping complex, marriage hall, residential apartments among others. It is estimated 30%-40% waste in the city is from their premises.

On April 24, in a meeting convened by Amit Khatri, strict instructions were given to ensure compliance with the SWM rules. These departments were instructed to segregate waste on-site and have their own composting units.

Interestingly, the MCG has twice written letters to these departments to begin waste segregation and processing. Inderjit Kulharia, the deputy municipal commissioner, said, “In March and May, we wrote letters to HSVP and town and country planning to identify bulk waste generators and begin segregation and composting processes.”

As per the bulk solid waste generators guideline, wet waste generated is to be segregated and processed through composting, while dry waste has to be handed over to the urban local body.

Meanwhile, the MCG has identified 1,800 bulk waste generators within the city, of which 76 begun managing the waste in a decentralised manner by segregating and composting. “Within a month, the number will reach 100,” told Kulharia.

HSIIDC has also found 15 such factories in their area, informed Subhash Vats, assistant general manager. He said, “It is a difficult process to go door-to-door and find these waste generators. Therefore, we want the enterprises to opt for self-declaration.”

Meanwhile, urban local bodies of different blocks have also identified bulk waste generators — 10 in Sohna, 18 in Pataudi and 25 in Farrukh Nagar. Haily Mandi is yet to identify these units.

Vaibhav Limaye, of the chief minister’s Good Governance Associates programme, said, “We are still not sure whether these numbers are exact because small hotels, restaurants, and street vendors are considered bulk waste generators. So, clearly, the list needs to be revised.”

First Published: Jun 10, 2019 05:52 IST