Gurgaon: Rescued Indian rock python in good health, set free in Aravallis | gurgaon | Hindustan Times
Today in New Delhi, India
Aug 18, 2018-Saturday
-°C
New Delhi
  • Humidity
    -
  • Wind
    -

Gurgaon: Rescued Indian rock python in good health, set free in Aravallis

A three-year-old eight-foot-long Indian rock python that was rescued by a wildlife team on Saturday night was released in the Aravalli forest on Monday evening after observing it for two nights.

gurgaon Updated: Aug 22, 2017 11:51 IST
Leena Dhankhar
Leena Dhankhar
Hindustan Times
Indian Rock Python,Snake,Sohna
The python was spotted in a drain outside the room of a residence in Silani village, Sohna.(HT Photo)

A three-year-old eight-foot-long Indian rock python that was rescued by a wildlife team on Saturday night was released in the Aravalli forest on Monday evening after observing it for two nights.

Tension had gripped the Sohna village after the python was sighted. The python was released after it was found in healthy condition and had even passed tests on Sunday and Monday, which is a healthy sign, said Krishna Kumar, a wildlife guard.

According to wildlife officials, the python weighs 15 kilograms and had ventured into the city from the Aravalli hills. The python was spotted in a drain outside the room of a residence in Silani village, Sohna.

Officials said that the python had survived by eating rats in the village, as no pet was found to be missing.

The villagers did not try to attack the python and immediately informed the wildlife rescue team. “This python is among the biggest to be spotted this year in the district. We have asked villagers to watch out for more snakes as their habitat get filled with water during rains and they move out of the dense forest,” said Dr Ashok Khasa, veterinary surgeon, wildlife.

“We have urged the city residents and villagers of the district not to harm a snake if they spot one inside their house or in their neighbourhood. They mostly exit forests during the monsoon and are often spotted entering residences, where there are rats or hens,” said Khasa.

“Pythons are a non-venomous snake species and are harmless. They mostly target small prey, like rats. During the rescue operation, the team had to be very careful as its teeth are needle-sharp and may have to be amputated in case of a bite,” said Khasa.

First Published: Aug 22, 2017 11:48 IST