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Home / Mumbai News / Amid lockdown, pandemic, citizens make Ganesh idols at home

Amid lockdown, pandemic, citizens make Ganesh idols at home

Like Chavan, many residents have decided this year to make their own idol.

mumbai Updated: Aug 06, 2020 01:18 IST
Balu Ganpat Chavan, 46, a head constable in Central police station in Ulhasnagar, works on the idol.
Balu Ganpat Chavan, 46, a head constable in Central police station in Ulhasnagar, works on the idol.(RISHIKESH CHOUDHARY)

For Balu Ganpat Chavan, 46, a head constable in Central police station in Ulhasnagar, Ganeshotsav means childhood memories. However, given the risk amid the Covid-19 pandemic this year, Chavan decided to sculpt a clay idol. In the three days that he got last week, after four months on Covid duty, he got his Ganpati idol ready.

Like Chavan, many residents have decided this year to make their own idol.

“During this tough time, we need the blessings of the lord, so missing the celebration was not an option. I decided to sculpt the idol with my son who cleared Class 10. However, with my busy schedule, it seemed difficult. Last week, I finally got leave for three days and bought clay from the market. I sculpted a two-foot tall idol and am now waiting for it to dry, so we can paint it,” said Chavan, a resident of Belavli in Badlapur. “I had done it earlier as a kid, but making the idol with family made it special.”

Dombivli-based artist Sharad Patil, 37, who is renowned for sketches, too is on a similar mission.

“Last year, we got our idol from a friend, but it is not advisable to get it from outside this year,” said Patil, who lives at Star colony, Dombivli (East).

The Bhoir family from Khadakpada in Kalyan thinks lockdown is an ideal time to make the Ganesh idol at home. Vishant Bhoir, 31, an interior designer, said, “We shifted to this house last year and wanted to make our own idol, but it was not possible as I was busy with work. This year, we are home and have lot of free time. I started work on the idol and my five-year old daughter, Saisha, too joined in.”

Instead of immersing the idol in a water body last year, the Bhoirs had immersed it at home and saved the mud. The family has made an 11-inch idol from the same mud.

“It took only four hours for me to finish shaping the idol. My daughter, too, stayed up with me to work on the idol. In these depressing times, the quality time with family seems like the greatest reward,” Bhoir said.

ht epaper

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