Photos: 75th Anniversary of Gandhi’s ‘Do or Die’ Quit India Movement

In the backdrop of World War II, Mahatma Gandhi at the 1942 Bombay session of the All India Congress Committee gave the clarion call of ‘Do or Die’, demanding an immediate end to British rule, creating the Quit India Movement --75 years to the day.

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST 7 Photos
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As postcolonial India approaches its 70th year of Independence, the Quit India Movement --a landmark moment in the struggle for independence also completes 75 years of its inception. The movement was launched on August 8, 1942 at the Bombay session of the All India Congress Committee by Mahatma Gandhi, who gave the clarion call of ‘Do or Die’, demanding an immediate end to British rule in India. Almost the entire leadership of the Congress was imprisoned immediately afterwards. (HT Photo)

As postcolonial India approaches its 70th year of Independence, the Quit India Movement --a landmark moment in the struggle for independence also completes 75 years of its inception. The movement was launched on August 8, 1942 at the Bombay session of the All India Congress Committee by Mahatma Gandhi, who gave the clarion call of ‘Do or Die’, demanding an immediate end to British rule in India. Almost the entire leadership of the Congress was imprisoned immediately afterwards. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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When Gandhi launched his non-violent satyagraha in opposition to the post World War II promises of the British government in the form of the ‘August Offer’ and the later revised Cripps Mission, the call for an individual Satyagraha went out and was first observed by Vinoba Bhave and later Jawaharlal Nehru, rousing followers across the country to take part civil disobedience, and individual Satyagraha. (HT Photo)

When Gandhi launched his non-violent satyagraha in opposition to the post World War II promises of the British government in the form of the ‘August Offer’ and the later revised Cripps Mission, the call for an individual Satyagraha went out and was first observed by Vinoba Bhave and later Jawaharlal Nehru, rousing followers across the country to take part civil disobedience, and individual Satyagraha. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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Although the British were able to dismantle the movement through swift political imprisonments, it was for the first time that the British realised that the days of the Raj in India were drawing to a close. More than 14,000 individuals were arrested by the British for heeding Gandhi’s call. (ht Photo)

Although the British were able to dismantle the movement through swift political imprisonments, it was for the first time that the British realised that the days of the Raj in India were drawing to a close. More than 14,000 individuals were arrested by the British for heeding Gandhi’s call. (ht Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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A poster of Aruna Asif Ali(extreme left, front) along with other revolutionary leaders of various underground movements. Aruna Asif Ali is widely remembered for hoisting the Indian National Congress flag at the Gowalia Tank maidan in Bombay during the Quit India Movement in 1942. (HT Photo)

A poster of Aruna Asif Ali(extreme left, front) along with other revolutionary leaders of various underground movements. Aruna Asif Ali is widely remembered for hoisting the Indian National Congress flag at the Gowalia Tank maidan in Bombay during the Quit India Movement in 1942. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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But the movement crumbled because of a lack of co-ordination among its leaders. Most businessmen were reaping profits because of the second World War and were not in favour of the Quit India movement. Politically, the Muslim League, the then banned Communist Party of India and the Hindu Mahasabha were also opposed to the movement. Meanwhile, the support of the younger generations was concentrated around Subhash Chandra Bose who was spending his time in exile. (HT Photo)

But the movement crumbled because of a lack of co-ordination among its leaders. Most businessmen were reaping profits because of the second World War and were not in favour of the Quit India movement. Politically, the Muslim League, the then banned Communist Party of India and the Hindu Mahasabha were also opposed to the movement. Meanwhile, the support of the younger generations was concentrated around Subhash Chandra Bose who was spending his time in exile. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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Isolated incidents of violence broke out around the country but the British acted quickly, arresting thousands of people and imprisoning them until 1945. The British also abolished civil rights, freedom of speech and the freedom of press during the Quit India Movement. (HT Photo)

Isolated incidents of violence broke out around the country but the British acted quickly, arresting thousands of people and imprisoning them until 1945. The British also abolished civil rights, freedom of speech and the freedom of press during the Quit India Movement. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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The Quit India movement was the last major civil disobedience movement before India became a sovereign nation in 1947. (HT Photo)

The Quit India movement was the last major civil disobedience movement before India became a sovereign nation in 1947. (HT Photo)

UPDATED ON AUG 09, 2017 01:34 PM IST
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