Photos: Ken-Batwa river linking project gets final approval

Last week, the environment ministry cleared the roads for the controversial Ken-Batwa river linking project, all set to be India’s first project of this kind. Questions have been raised about environmental and ethical concerns which will impact not just the rivers but also the livelihood that exists around them.

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST 7 Photos
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A man fishes in the Ken river in Bundelkhand, Madhya Pradesh. The environment ministry has given the final approval for the Ken-Batwa river linking project. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

A man fishes in the Ken river in Bundelkhand, Madhya Pradesh. The environment ministry has given the final approval for the Ken-Batwa river linking project. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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The new dam under construction on the Ken river in Madhya Pradesh in Bundelkhand, India last year. The linking project envisages diversion of surplus water from Ken basin to water-deficit Betwa basin. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

The new dam under construction on the Ken river in Madhya Pradesh in Bundelkhand, India last year. The linking project envisages diversion of surplus water from Ken basin to water-deficit Betwa basin. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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Migratory birds fly over the Gangau Dam and Reservoir on Ken river in Panna National Park in Chhattarpur district, Madhya Pradesh. A MoU was signed in 2005 between the Centre and the two states (MP and UP) to start work on the project. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

Migratory birds fly over the Gangau Dam and Reservoir on Ken river in Panna National Park in Chhattarpur district, Madhya Pradesh. A MoU was signed in 2005 between the Centre and the two states (MP and UP) to start work on the project. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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Villagers who live on the side of the Panna forest reserve fear conditions of famine, since illegal sand mining has already changed the course of the river Ken. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

Villagers who live on the side of the Panna forest reserve fear conditions of famine, since illegal sand mining has already changed the course of the river Ken. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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A man walks over truck tire tracks on Ken’s rich river bed. Plagued by illegal sand mining, locals allege that the involvement of the local authorities has only destroyed the ecology. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

A man walks over truck tire tracks on Ken’s rich river bed. Plagued by illegal sand mining, locals allege that the involvement of the local authorities has only destroyed the ecology. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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Criticisms of the project range from Ken not being a perennial river to the threat of flooding, since Ken does not have excess water. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

Criticisms of the project range from Ken not being a perennial river to the threat of flooding, since Ken does not have excess water. (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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According to the National Water Development Agency, the project will provide irrigation, domestic &industrial water supply and power to Chhatarpur, Panna and Tikamgarh (MP) and Mahoba, Jhansi and Banda (UP). (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

According to the National Water Development Agency, the project will provide irrigation, domestic &industrial water supply and power to Chhatarpur, Panna and Tikamgarh (MP) and Mahoba, Jhansi and Banda (UP). (Vipin Kumar / HT PHOTO)

UPDATED ON OCT 03, 2017 02:40 PM IST
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