Climbing Everest in the 2017 season is fraught with risks

Updated On May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST
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The world’s highest mountain has been in the news recently for several reasons. Two Indian women broke their own climbing records while three mountaineers including an Indian have died on the mountain in the past week and news has now emerged that the historic Hillary Step on the south-east ridge on the mountain has collapsed, potentially making it more dangerous to climb in the final stages of attempting the summit. A record number of 371 climbing permits have been issued for this season due to pent up demand in the aftermath of the 2015 Nepal earthquake and the tragic death of 16 people in a 2014 avalanche disaster which limited climbing on the mountain. (GURINDER OSAN/AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

The world’s highest mountain has been in the news recently for several reasons. Two Indian women broke their own climbing records while three mountaineers including an Indian have died on the mountain in the past week and news has now emerged that the historic Hillary Step on the south-east ridge on the mountain has collapsed, potentially making it more dangerous to climb in the final stages of attempting the summit. A record number of 371 climbing permits have been issued for this season due to pent up demand in the aftermath of the 2015 Nepal earthquake and the tragic death of 16 people in a 2014 avalanche disaster which limited climbing on the mountain. (GURINDER OSAN/AP)

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Five-time Everest summiteer from Arunachal Pradesh, Anshu Jamsenpa has become the world’s first woman mountaineer to scale Mount Everest twice in five days. She unfurled Indian tricolor on the summit on 16th May and again on 21st May 2017, breaking her own ‘double ascent’ record of 2011 where she climbed the summit twice in ten days. (PTI) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

Five-time Everest summiteer from Arunachal Pradesh, Anshu Jamsenpa has become the world’s first woman mountaineer to scale Mount Everest twice in five days. She unfurled Indian tricolor on the summit on 16th May and again on 21st May 2017, breaking her own ‘double ascent’ record of 2011 where she climbed the summit twice in ten days. (PTI)

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In 2017, a record number of 371 climbing permits were issued to climb Mount Everest in this season not including Sherpas accompanying the climbers. In the past, many people have died on the mountain during a rush by climbers to take advantage of favourable weather, resulting in a human traffic jam potentially creating a hazard for those waiting on the mountain to climb especially inexperienced people who may not be able to react quickly to unpredictable weather changes or those who disregard safety increasing fatalities on the peak. (AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

In 2017, a record number of 371 climbing permits were issued to climb Mount Everest in this season not including Sherpas accompanying the climbers. In the past, many people have died on the mountain during a rush by climbers to take advantage of favourable weather, resulting in a human traffic jam potentially creating a hazard for those waiting on the mountain to climb especially inexperienced people who may not be able to react quickly to unpredictable weather changes or those who disregard safety increasing fatalities on the peak. (AFP)

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Anita Kundu, a sub inspector in the Haryana Police, scaled Mount Everest for the second time in four years on Sunday. Kundu had scaled the highest peak from the Nepal side on May 18, 2013 in her previous attempt. (PTI) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

Anita Kundu, a sub inspector in the Haryana Police, scaled Mount Everest for the second time in four years on Sunday. Kundu had scaled the highest peak from the Nepal side on May 18, 2013 in her previous attempt. (PTI)

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In this photograph released by South African mountaineer Ryan Sean Davy on May 18, 2017, Davy takes a 'selfie' as he climbs on the Nepalese side of Mount Everest. Ryan Sean Davy was arrested in Nepal for attempting to climb Mount Everest without paying the $11,000 permit fee. (RYAN SEAN DAVY/AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

In this photograph released by South African mountaineer Ryan Sean Davy on May 18, 2017, Davy takes a 'selfie' as he climbs on the Nepalese side of Mount Everest. Ryan Sean Davy was arrested in Nepal for attempting to climb Mount Everest without paying the $11,000 permit fee. (RYAN SEAN DAVY/AFP)

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In this file photo from April 2017, Nepali mountaineer Min Bahadur Sherchan, 85, performs yoga in Kathmandu. Serchan died at base camp in early May while attempting to climb Everest to try and retain his earlier title of the oldest person to conquer the world's highest mountain. (REUTERS) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

In this file photo from April 2017, Nepali mountaineer Min Bahadur Sherchan, 85, performs yoga in Kathmandu. Serchan died at base camp in early May while attempting to climb Everest to try and retain his earlier title of the oldest person to conquer the world's highest mountain. (REUTERS)

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This handout picture released by DJ Paul Oakenfold's SoundTrek on April 10, 2017 and taken on April 8 shows the British artist in Khumjung as he hikes to Mount Everest's base camp ahead of a concert billed as the "highest party on earth". Influential British DJ Paul Oakenfold reached Mount Everest's base camp where he planned to host the ‘highest party on earth’, performing a set at 5,380 meters (17,600 feet). As climbing season in Nepal kicks into gear, few of the mountaineers heading to the world's highest peak were likely expecting to be joined by the three-time Grammy nominated artist and his dance beats. (ANTON NELSON / SOUNDTREK/AFP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

This handout picture released by DJ Paul Oakenfold's SoundTrek on April 10, 2017 and taken on April 8 shows the British artist in Khumjung as he hikes to Mount Everest's base camp ahead of a concert billed as the "highest party on earth". Influential British DJ Paul Oakenfold reached Mount Everest's base camp where he planned to host the ‘highest party on earth’, performing a set at 5,380 meters (17,600 feet). As climbing season in Nepal kicks into gear, few of the mountaineers heading to the world's highest peak were likely expecting to be joined by the three-time Grammy nominated artist and his dance beats. (ANTON NELSON / SOUNDTREK/AFP)

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In this March 11, 2017 file photo, trekkers hike towards Everest Base camp near Lobuche, Nepal. Mountaineering expedition organizers in Nepal are sending huge trash bags with climbers on Mount Everest during the spring climbing season to collect trash that then can be winched by helicopters back to the base camp. (AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

In this March 11, 2017 file photo, trekkers hike towards Everest Base camp near Lobuche, Nepal. Mountaineering expedition organizers in Nepal are sending huge trash bags with climbers on Mount Everest during the spring climbing season to collect trash that then can be winched by helicopters back to the base camp. (AP)

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Trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp. Thousands of tourists visit the base camp every year resulting in overcrowding and environmental degradation. (AP) View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 23, 2017 09:15 AM IST

Trekkers pass through a glacier at the Mount Everest base camp. Thousands of tourists visit the base camp every year resulting in overcrowding and environmental degradation. (AP)

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