Photos: Five years after Rana Plaza collapse, demands for safety and justice

In Savar, Bangladesh on Tuesday a few hundred workers, activists and relatives of victims of Rana Plaza garment factory collapse took to the streets as Bangladesh marked the fifth anniversary of the tragedy. The disaster killed at least 1,130 people and left thousands injured. A recent survey says that there have been tremendous improvements in the larger factories but the garment workers are still exposed to life-threatening risks, ranging from a lack of fire safety equipment to serious structural flaws.

Updated On Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST
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A relative of a victim of the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse cries during a protest. Hundreds of Bangladeshi citizens staged protests and paid tearful tributes at Rana Plaza on Tuesday in Dhaka, marking the fifth anniversary of one of the world’s worst industrial disasters, when a textile factory complex collapse killed at least 1,130 people and left thousands injured. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

A relative of a victim of the Rana Plaza garment factory collapse cries during a protest. Hundreds of Bangladeshi citizens staged protests and paid tearful tributes at Rana Plaza on Tuesday in Dhaka, marking the fifth anniversary of one of the world’s worst industrial disasters, when a textile factory complex collapse killed at least 1,130 people and left thousands injured. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Volunteers and rescue workers seen a day after the Rana Plaza collapse on April 24, 2013 in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka. The factory building had been expanded illegally, with additional floors stacked one on top of another. An engineer had declared it unsafe, and the thousands of people who worked inside, stitching garments for clothing brands from around the world, knew it was trouble. (Munir Uz Zaman / AFP File)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Volunteers and rescue workers seen a day after the Rana Plaza collapse on April 24, 2013 in Savar, on the outskirts of Dhaka. The factory building had been expanded illegally, with additional floors stacked one on top of another. An engineer had declared it unsafe, and the thousands of people who worked inside, stitching garments for clothing brands from around the world, knew it was trouble. (Munir Uz Zaman / AFP File)

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Nilufa Begum, 38, who worked on the 7th floor of the Rana Plaza, sits at home in Savar. “It had weak pillars, it had narrow stairwells, it had no fire exits. We saw cracks in the building before it collapsed on us,” said Khadiza Begum, who was working at the factory the day it collapsed. Union leaders and survivors have expressed anger at the slow pace of the trial of Sohel Rana, whose family owned the complex. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Nilufa Begum, 38, who worked on the 7th floor of the Rana Plaza, sits at home in Savar. “It had weak pillars, it had narrow stairwells, it had no fire exits. We saw cracks in the building before it collapsed on us,” said Khadiza Begum, who was working at the factory the day it collapsed. Union leaders and survivors have expressed anger at the slow pace of the trial of Sohel Rana, whose family owned the complex. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Relatives of victims gather at the site of Rana Plaza recalling the tragedy. Jolly Talukder, union leader said the injured workers have become the living dead. Talukder demanded the release of some $14.5 million which she said was donated to a government fund for victims. But the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association said the victims and their families have already been compensated. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Relatives of victims gather at the site of Rana Plaza recalling the tragedy. Jolly Talukder, union leader said the injured workers have become the living dead. Talukder demanded the release of some $14.5 million which she said was donated to a government fund for victims. But the Bangladesh Garment Manufacturers and Exporters Association said the victims and their families have already been compensated. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Sharmin Akhter hugs her mother Moyna Begum, who five years ago worked at Rana Plaza. The disaster focused international attention on Bangladesh’s role as the world’s second-largest garment producer, and led the government and manufacturing associations to promise big improvements. As a result many of the world’s top clothing brands said they would stop contracting with factories if they failed to improve safety for their workers. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Sharmin Akhter hugs her mother Moyna Begum, who five years ago worked at Rana Plaza. The disaster focused international attention on Bangladesh’s role as the world’s second-largest garment producer, and led the government and manufacturing associations to promise big improvements. As a result many of the world’s top clothing brands said they would stop contracting with factories if they failed to improve safety for their workers. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Workers eat lunch at the Snowtex garment factory in Dhamrai, Bangladesh. The factory, a few kilometers from where Rana Plaza stood, has about 8,000 workers on its five floors spread over 52,000 square feet each. It has wide stairwells, emergency exits, fire safety equipment, sprinklers and first-aid equipment on hand. Workers have been trained in fire safety and rescue techniques and regular fire drills are performed. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Workers eat lunch at the Snowtex garment factory in Dhamrai, Bangladesh. The factory, a few kilometers from where Rana Plaza stood, has about 8,000 workers on its five floors spread over 52,000 square feet each. It has wide stairwells, emergency exits, fire safety equipment, sprinklers and first-aid equipment on hand. Workers have been trained in fire safety and rescue techniques and regular fire drills are performed. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Overgrown bushes cover the area where the Rana Plaza once stood. A recent study conducted by the Center for Business and Human Rights at New York University found that textile factory workers at about 3,000 of the country’s 7,000 factories are still exposed to life-threatening risks, ranging from a lack of fire safety equipment to serious structural flaws. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Overgrown bushes cover the area where the Rana Plaza once stood. A recent study conducted by the Center for Business and Human Rights at New York University found that textile factory workers at about 3,000 of the country’s 7,000 factories are still exposed to life-threatening risks, ranging from a lack of fire safety equipment to serious structural flaws. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Khadiza Begum, 23, who was trapped for hours after the Rana Plaza collapse was so shaken by the experience she didn’t work for two years. Eventually, with her family desperately needing money, she got a job at Snowtex. “It’s very different here,” she said, sitting in front of a sewing machine. “This building is good and strong.” (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Khadiza Begum, 23, who was trapped for hours after the Rana Plaza collapse was so shaken by the experience she didn’t work for two years. Eventually, with her family desperately needing money, she got a job at Snowtex. “It’s very different here,” she said, sitting in front of a sewing machine. “This building is good and strong.” (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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Many of the improvements were brought on with pressure from two safety programs organized by foreign textile brands. Under the programs, 2,300 factories have been inspected and many have upgraded their safety standards. however, industry insiders guardedly admit that subcontracting remains an issue, with larger businesses sometimes contracting work to smaller, less-safe factories. (A.M. Ahad / AP)
Updated on Apr 25, 2018 12:13 PM IST

Many of the improvements were brought on with pressure from two safety programs organized by foreign textile brands. Under the programs, 2,300 factories have been inspected and many have upgraded their safety standards. however, industry insiders guardedly admit that subcontracting remains an issue, with larger businesses sometimes contracting work to smaller, less-safe factories. (A.M. Ahad / AP)

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