Photos | Hurricane hit Puerto Rico without power for weeks: Trump visits for survey

Two weeks after hit by the worst hurricane in 90 years, many of Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million residents are still struggling with basic necessities especially power shortage. During Trump's recent visits to the ones afftected by huriicane Maria he said, Puerto Rico crisis had thrown US budget ‘a little out of whack’.

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST 11 Photos
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U.S. President Donald Trump walks past wreckage caused by Hurricane Maria as he participates in a walking tour with First Lady Melania Trump (L) in damaged areas in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, U.S. Nearly two weeks after the storm, 95 percent of electricity customers remain without power, including some hospitals. US President expressed satisfaction on Tuesday with the federal response to Hurricane Maria’s devastation of Puerto Rico, despite criticism that the government was slow to address the crisis. (Jonathan Ernst / REUTERS )

U.S. President Donald Trump walks past wreckage caused by Hurricane Maria as he participates in a walking tour with First Lady Melania Trump (L) in damaged areas in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico, U.S. Nearly two weeks after the storm, 95 percent of electricity customers remain without power, including some hospitals. US President expressed satisfaction on Tuesday with the federal response to Hurricane Maria’s devastation of Puerto Rico, despite criticism that the government was slow to address the crisis. (Jonathan Ernst / REUTERS )

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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A car drives on a damaged road in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Two weeks after it was hit by the worst hurricane in 90 years, many of Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million residents are still struggling with basic necessities. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

A car drives on a damaged road in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico. Two weeks after it was hit by the worst hurricane in 90 years, many of Puerto Rico’s 3.4 million residents are still struggling with basic necessities. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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Local residents sit at their apartment's balcony as areas of San Juan are still left without electricity following Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. Residents are without cell phone signals and fuels for their generators and cars. About 88 percent of cellphone sites are still out of service. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

Local residents sit at their apartment's balcony as areas of San Juan are still left without electricity following Hurricane Maria in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. Residents are without cell phone signals and fuels for their generators and cars. About 88 percent of cellphone sites are still out of service. (Alvin Baez / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump (R) are greeted upon arrival on the USS Kearsarge, off Puerto Rico. Trump who has grappled with hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in the past six weeks, said at a briefing that the disasters were straining the U.S. budget. (Mandel Ngan / AFP)

US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump (R) are greeted upon arrival on the USS Kearsarge, off Puerto Rico. Trump who has grappled with hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria in the past six weeks, said at a briefing that the disasters were straining the U.S. budget. (Mandel Ngan / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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People rally outside of Trump Tower in support of Puerto Rico in New York. The protesters were critical of the Trump administration's response to the storm. (Spencer Platt / AFP)

People rally outside of Trump Tower in support of Puerto Rico in New York. The protesters were critical of the Trump administration's response to the storm. (Spencer Platt / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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A man uses a flashlight at the Moradas Las Teresas Elderly House, where about two hundred elderly people are living without electricity following damages caused by Hurricane Maria. (Carlos Barria / REUTERS)

A man uses a flashlight at the Moradas Las Teresas Elderly House, where about two hundred elderly people are living without electricity following damages caused by Hurricane Maria. (Carlos Barria / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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Sharmaine Williams Stapleton fans a wood stove during an informal street gathering in the darkened neighbourhood of Whim Estate in the hard-hit Frederiksted area of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The street gathering of a few families to eat and relax ‘is the best way to deal with what's happened,’she said. (Jonathan Drake / REUTERS)

Sharmaine Williams Stapleton fans a wood stove during an informal street gathering in the darkened neighbourhood of Whim Estate in the hard-hit Frederiksted area of St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The street gathering of a few families to eat and relax ‘is the best way to deal with what's happened,’she said. (Jonathan Drake / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump (R) take part in a food and supply distribution at the Cavalry Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. The U.S. territory’s economy was already in recession before Hurricane Maria and its government had filed for bankruptcy in the face of a $72 billion debt load. In an interview with Fox News, Trump said the island’s debt would be erased. (Mandel Ngan / AFP)

US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump (R) take part in a food and supply distribution at the Cavalry Chapel in Guaynabo, Puerto Rico. The U.S. territory’s economy was already in recession before Hurricane Maria and its government had filed for bankruptcy in the face of a $72 billion debt load. In an interview with Fox News, Trump said the island’s debt would be erased. (Mandel Ngan / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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A worker repairs an electrical line following damages caused by the hurricane in San Juan. Shortly after Trump left Puerto Rico, Governor Ricardo Rosello said the death toll had risen from 16 to 34. (/Carlos Barria / REUTERS)

A worker repairs an electrical line following damages caused by the hurricane in San Juan. Shortly after Trump left Puerto Rico, Governor Ricardo Rosello said the death toll had risen from 16 to 34. (/Carlos Barria / REUTERS)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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Solar panel debris is seen scattered in a solar panel field in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

Solar panel debris is seen scattered in a solar panel field in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria in Humacao, Puerto Rico. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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Cars drive on a highway next to downed power line poles by Hurricane Maria in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico. While the region reels in darkness, the road to rebuilding and restoring power completely across the area is expected to take atleast a month despite the financial aid from Washington. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

Cars drive on a highway next to downed power line poles by Hurricane Maria in Vega Alta, Puerto Rico. While the region reels in darkness, the road to rebuilding and restoring power completely across the area is expected to take atleast a month despite the financial aid from Washington. (Ricardo Arduengo / AFP)

UPDATED ON OCT 04, 2017 01:11 PM IST
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