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The way we eat now: Scene at a mall in Mumbai.(Universal Images Group via Getty)

Review: Business of Taste by Centre for Science and Environment

Hindustan Times | By Vivek Menezes
UPDATED ON OCT 25, 2019 08:21 PM IST
Business of Taste highlights high-nutrition foods that have fallen out of traditional diets at calamitous cost
It’s a rather long expedition that nature undertakes each summer. Moisture-laden winds in the south-Pacific start racing northwards, preparing to travel more than 8,000 km to reach the Indian subcontinent on time.(PTI)
It’s a rather long expedition that nature undertakes each summer. Moisture-laden winds in the south-Pacific start racing northwards, preparing to travel more than 8,000 km to reach the Indian subcontinent on time.(PTI)

The monsoon shortfall won’t lead to food scarcity, but will hurt incomes

Hindustan Times | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON JUL 24, 2019 06:41 PM IST
.The 1943 Bengal famine, following a missed monsoon, killed an estimated four million. In 2009, a drought year, the country managed to produce a million more tonne of foodgrains than it did in 2007, a normal year. This obviously has to do with better agricultural practices, leading to higher productivity.
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