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cancer research

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While the study does not establish that slow walking is a cause of death, the association persisted across at least nine tumour types.(Unsplash)

Study finds walking pace among cancer survivors may be important for survival

ANI | , Washington [us]
PUBLISHED ON MAR 05, 2021 01:08 PM IST
A new study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the National Cancer Institute has identified an association between slow walking pace and an increased risk of death among cancer survivors.
Most tumors consist of a heterogeneous mix of cells. Genetic mutations found only in some of these cells are known to aid with the spread and progression of cancer.(Unsplash)
Most tumors consist of a heterogeneous mix of cells. Genetic mutations found only in some of these cells are known to aid with the spread and progression of cancer.(Unsplash)

Scientists drive detailed study into how cancer cells spread

ANI | , Tokyo [japan]
PUBLISHED ON FEB 13, 2021 03:31 PM IST
With the help of the mouse model, scientists of Kanazawa University drove a detailed study to explain how the cells which are known to aid with the spread and progression of cancer commute in the body.
Known as My Personal Mutanome (MPM), the platform features an interactive database that provides insight into the role of disease-associated mutations in cancer and prioritises mutations that may be responsive to drug therapies.(Pixabay)
Known as My Personal Mutanome (MPM), the platform features an interactive database that provides insight into the role of disease-associated mutations in cancer and prioritises mutations that may be responsive to drug therapies.(Pixabay)

Scientists develop platform to advance medicine research for cancer

ANI | , Cleveland (ohio) [us]
PUBLISHED ON FEB 09, 2021 05:19 PM IST
A new study published in Genome Biology features a new personalised platform developed by the Cleveland Clinic researchers that will help to accelerate advanced research on genomic medicine and genome-informed drug therapies for cancer mutations.
A study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer.(Unsplash)
A study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer.(Unsplash)

Oral contraceptive pills protect against ovarian, endometrial cancer

Washington DC | By Asian News International | Posted by Shivani Kale
PUBLISHED ON DEC 17, 2020 06:03 PM IST
A study from Uppsala University, involving more than 250,000 women, shows that oral contraceptive use protects against ovarian and endometrial cancer.
The study is significant because early detection of cancer and risk stratification of seemingly normal individuals remains an ongoing public health challenge.(Pixabay)
The study is significant because early detection of cancer and risk stratification of seemingly normal individuals remains an ongoing public health challenge.(Pixabay)

Studies shows 230 times higher one year cancer risk if tumor cell clusters are detected in Blood of Normal Individuals

Mumbai, India | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Jahnavi Gupta
UPDATED ON SEP 29, 2020 02:19 PM IST
A landmark study published in the American Association of Cancer Research’s prestigious journal ‘Cancer Prevention Research’ has shown that it is possible to identify healthy individuals with higher risk of cancer based on a simple blood draw.
Led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital, the finding of their study are published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)
Led by investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital, the finding of their study are published in Cancer Discovery, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (Representational Image)(Unsplash)

Researchers have discovered new strategy to treat brain cancer patients

Washington D.C. [USA] | By Asian News International | Posted by Saumya Sharma
UPDATED ON JUL 01, 2020 06:52 PM IST
A team of investigators has uncovered a potentially promising strategy to target brain tumours -- isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) genes, which are the most common brain tumours diagnosed in younger adults aged 18 to 45 years.
Link between PTSD and ovarian cancer remained for the most aggressive forms of ovarian cancer.(Unsplash)
Link between PTSD and ovarian cancer remained for the most aggressive forms of ovarian cancer.(Unsplash)

PTSD linked to increased risk of ovarian cancer

New York | By Indo Asian News Service
UPDATED ON SEP 07, 2019 06:44 PM IST
Women who experienced six or more symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) at some point in life have a greater risk of developing ovarian cancer compared to women who never had any PTSDs.
The new findings, from researchers at the University of Leeds found that overall, smokers were 40% less likely to survive their disease than people who have never smoked within a decade after their diagnosis.(Unsplash)
The new findings, from researchers at the University of Leeds found that overall, smokers were 40% less likely to survive their disease than people who have never smoked within a decade after their diagnosis.(Unsplash)

Smoking may limit body’s ability to fight dangerous form of skin cancer

Asian News International | By Asian News International, Washington D.c.
UPDATED ON FEB 19, 2019 03:20 PM IST
The new study of more than 700 melanoma patients, funded by Cancer Research UK, published in Cancer Research, provides evidence to suggest that smoking may blight the immune response against melanoma and reduce survival.
Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer: Study(Unsplash)
Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer: Study(Unsplash)

Immune stimulant molecule shown to prevent cancer: Study

Press Trust of India | By Press Trust of India, Washington
UPDATED ON FEB 15, 2019 04:15 PM IST
The recombinant protein molecule SA-4-1BBL has been used to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cancer vaccines with success in pre-clinical animal models, said researchers from the University of Louisville in the US.
The award is part of a grant programme called R35 developed by the National Cancer Institute.(Shutterstock/Representative image)
The award is part of a grant programme called R35 developed by the National Cancer Institute.(Shutterstock/Representative image)

Indian-American scientist awarded $6.5 million to identify cancer biomarkers

Washington | By Press Trust of India
UPDATED ON SEP 11, 2018 07:24 PM IST
The grant awarded by the US National Cancer Institute to Arul Chinnaiyan, a professor at University of Michigan, will provide long-term support to increase understanding of these markers to leverage targeted treatments for cancer.
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines appear to misinterpret intermittent noisy signals as stronger, sustained signals, triggering excessive growth and tumour formation.(Shutterstock)
Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines appear to misinterpret intermittent noisy signals as stronger, sustained signals, triggering excessive growth and tumour formation.(Shutterstock)

Genetic mutations could be responsible for driving tumour formation

Asian News International | By Asian News International, Washington D.c
UPDATED ON SEP 01, 2018 11:05 AM IST
The study has important implications for understanding and ultimately targeting the defective mechanisms underlying many human cancers.
Globally, among women, the mortality rate for lung cancer is projected to increase from 11.2 in 2015 to 16.0 in 2030.(Shutterstock)
Globally, among women, the mortality rate for lung cancer is projected to increase from 11.2 in 2015 to 16.0 in 2030.(Shutterstock)

Lung cancer death rate for women may rise to 40% by 2030

Asian News International | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON AUG 01, 2018 03:28 PM IST
Lung cancer mortality rates among women could increase by 43% by 2030, while breast cancer mortality rate is projected to decrease by 9% in the same time frame, says a new study.
In up to 60% of cases, the diagnosis is late because the growth has not been recognised, or has been mistaken as harmless.(Shutterstock)
In up to 60% of cases, the diagnosis is late because the growth has not been recognised, or has been mistaken as harmless.(Shutterstock)

New way to diagnose head, neck cancer in early stages discovered

Hindustan Times, Delhi | By Kabir Bhandari, Hindustan Times, Delhi
UPDATED ON JUN 27, 2018 12:40 PM IST
This new way of drawing distinction between malignant and benign cells could enable an early confirmation of cancer diagnoses, by testing cell samples of suspect oral lesions.
Childhood cancer survivors are advised to undergo screening for the detection of heart dysfunction.(Shutterstock)
Childhood cancer survivors are advised to undergo screening for the detection of heart dysfunction.(Shutterstock)

This wireless device can detect heart dysfunction in cancer survivors

Indo Asian News Service | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON JUN 24, 2018 01:09 PM IST
Survivors of childhood cancer may soon have a new wireless device to monitor possible heart dysfunction.
Romita Ghosh.(HT Photo)
Romita Ghosh.(HT Photo)

Tackling life with grit & grace

Hindustan Times, Lucknow | By Farah Rizvi, Lucknow
PUBLISHED ON MAY 15, 2018 05:42 PM IST
Meet Romita Ghosh, winner of saving lives after defying death category.
The two institutes have signed a memorandum of understanding with the US-based National Cancer Institute to avail their expertise for the study.(HT File/Representational Image)
The two institutes have signed a memorandum of understanding with the US-based National Cancer Institute to avail their expertise for the study.(HT File/Representational Image)

Tata Memorial Centre, IIT-Bombay sign cancer research MoUs

Hindustan Times | By Aayushi Pratap, Mumbai
UPDATED ON MAY 03, 2018 11:51 AM IST
The DNA samples from tumours of patients with major cancers such as breast, cervical, ovarian and head and neck, will be studied at TMH.
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