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cognitive ability

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Head injuries did not appear to contribute to brain damage characteristic of Alzheimer's disease, but might make people more vulnerable to dementia symptoms.(Unsplash)

Here's how head injuries may worsen cognitive decline decades later

ANI |
PUBLISHED ON MAR 12, 2021 05:03 PM IST
People who experienced head injuries in their 50s or younger score lower than expected on cognitive tests at age 70, according to a study led by University College London researchers.
The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, by researchers at the University of Kentucky establishes what they believe is a new way to predict the risk years before a clinical diagnosis.(Unsplash)
The study, published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, by researchers at the University of Kentucky establishes what they believe is a new way to predict the risk years before a clinical diagnosis.(Unsplash)

A new method to predict individual risk of cognitive decline

ANI |
PUBLISHED ON FEB 05, 2021 04:46 PM IST
The early prognosis of high-risk older adults for amnestic mild cognitive impairment, using non-invasive and sensitive neuro markers, is key for early prevention of Alzheimer's disease, suggested the findings of a new study.
As per the findings published in the journal, Scientific Reports, during stimulation, the active electrode can transmit a positive or negative electrical charge.(Unsplash)
As per the findings published in the journal, Scientific Reports, during stimulation, the active electrode can transmit a positive or negative electrical charge.(Unsplash)

Direct current stimulation over brain's Wernicke area helpful in learning words

ANI |
PUBLISHED ON JAN 25, 2021 12:56 PM IST
Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation, which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.(ANI)
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.(ANI)

Direct current stimulation over brain's Wernicke area can help learning words

ANI |
PUBLISHED ON JAN 22, 2021 02:02 PM IST
A new study has found out that Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS), which is a non-invasive way of stimulating the brain over the Wernicke's area, may lead to new assistive neurotechnologies for the rehabilitation of people with cognitive disorders in future.
The study shows that even seemingly negative human social behaviours may confer cognitive benefits when such behaviours call for goal pursuing, problem solving, mental state tracking, and perspective taking.(Unsplash)
The study shows that even seemingly negative human social behaviours may confer cognitive benefits when such behaviours call for goal pursuing, problem solving, mental state tracking, and perspective taking.(Unsplash)

Kids who learn to lie may be smarter, enjoy cognitive benefits

Press Trust of India | By HT Correspondent
UPDATED ON SEP 03, 2018 03:13 PM IST
Children who learn to lie early in their life tend to have much better cognitive abilities, says a new study.
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