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Fast walking in narrow spaces behind a group of people can significantly increase Covid-19 transmission risk, according to a study.(Pixabay)

Fast walking in narrow corridors can increase Covid-19 transmission risk: Study

Press Trust of India | By Press Trust of India | Posted by Shivani Kale
UPDATED ON DEC 16, 2020 01:18 PM IST
Fast walking in narrow spaces behind a group of people can significantly increase Covid-19 transmission risk, according to a study.
Dark matter is the invisible glue that holds stars together inside a galaxy.(REUTERS)
Dark matter is the invisible glue that holds stars together inside a galaxy.(REUTERS)

Scientists confounded by new findings on universe’s mysterious dark matter

Washington | By Reuters| Posted by Susmita Pakrasi
UPDATED ON SEP 12, 2020 10:13 AM IST
Research published this week revealed an unexpected discrepancy between observations of dark matter concentrations in three massive clusters of galaxies encompassing trillions of stars and theoretical computer simulations of how dark matter should be distributed.
Scientists at IIT Madras have developed an algorithm that can help manage dense crowds using minimal manpower, and prevent deadly stampedes in huge public gatherings like the Kumbh Mela and the Hajj.(AFP)
Scientists at IIT Madras have developed an algorithm that can help manage dense crowds using minimal manpower, and prevent deadly stampedes in huge public gatherings like the Kumbh Mela and the Hajj.(AFP)

Algorithm to control huge crowds during Kumbh, Hajj designed by IIT Madras

Chennai | By Press Trust of India
UPDATED ON FEB 21, 2019 04:37 PM IST
Using a computer simulation, researchers can intelligently plan where to place police personnel to quickly quell disturbances in a crowd that could otherwise lead to panic and chaos.
A realistic prehistoric early man neanderthal reproduction in Trento Museum of Natural History.(Shutterstock)
A realistic prehistoric early man neanderthal reproduction in Trento Museum of Natural History.(Shutterstock)

Our ancestors had bigger noses to help them breathe better. They required more calories per day

Agence France-Presse, Paris | By HT Correspondent
PUBLISHED ON APR 04, 2018 03:30 PM IST
Neanderthals could also move “considerably more” air through their nasal cavity, possibly in response to higher energy requirements for their stocky bodies and hunting lifestyle. Neanderthals were thought to have required as much as 4,480 calories per day to keep them alive in the European winter. For a modern human male, 2,500 daily calories are recommended.
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