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mumbai exhibition

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Festival of Buckrah Eade, Outside the fort at Delhi by John Luard, 1832-38(Courtesy: Dilnavaz Mehta)

This Mumbai exhibition showcases rare artworks from the colonial era

Hindustan Times | By Soma Das
UPDATED ON NOV 30, 2018 12:19 PM IST
Art historian Dilnavaz Mehta’s Rare Finds exhibition puts the spotlight on artworks, maps and books that date back to the colonial era.
Sanjhi is an art form rooted in the folk culture of Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, and later became an integral part of Vaishnavite traditions.(Courtesy: Artisans’)
Sanjhi is an art form rooted in the folk culture of Mathura, Uttar Pradesh, and later became an integral part of Vaishnavite traditions.(Courtesy: Artisans’)

Paper cut: This Mumbai exhibition celebrates the ancient stencil art of Sanjhi

Hindustan Times | By Soma Das
UPDATED ON NOV 10, 2018 03:20 PM IST
The stencil art of Sanjhi has its roots in Indian folk culture and is associated with Vaishnav temple traditions. An exhibition in Mumbai throws light on it.
Through her mixed media exhibition, Meera Devidayal narrates the way Mumbai has encroached upon the sea and how it’s fighting back.(Photo courtesy Anil Rane, Chemould Prescott Road and the artist)
Through her mixed media exhibition, Meera Devidayal narrates the way Mumbai has encroached upon the sea and how it’s fighting back.(Photo courtesy Anil Rane, Chemould Prescott Road and the artist)

Head to exhibitions that explore themes of nostalgia, harmony

Hindustan Times | By Krutika Behrawala and Riddhi Doshi
UPDATED ON APR 21, 2018 09:30 AM IST
Revisit the city through its seascapes, muse over concepts of sacrifice in the name of peace.
Chandrama ka Shringar, Mughal miniature, stone colour on cloth.(Courtesy: Pooja Singhal)
Chandrama ka Shringar, Mughal miniature, stone colour on cloth.(Courtesy: Pooja Singhal)

This Mumbai exhibition gives a contemporary spin to traditional Pichvai painting

Hindustan Times, Mumbai | By Soma Das
UPDATED ON APR 03, 2018 12:03 PM IST
An exhibition at Famous Studios in Mumbai traces the evolution of Pichvai textiles, which were originally hung behind the idol in Vaishnav shrines, and explores how the craft can be reinvented as wall art.
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