Rockets, gunfire and a selfie: Iraqi troops enter Mosul airport for first time since 2014

There was still morning mist in the air when Iraq’s Rapid Response units began their push to take Mosul airport from the Islamic State group on Thursday.
Smoke billows as Iraqi forces attack Mosul airport during an offensive to retake the western side of the city from jihadists of the Islamic State group on February 23, 2017. Iraqi forces entered Mosul airport, which lies on the southern edge of the city, for the first time since the Islamic State group overran the region in 2014.(AFP)
Smoke billows as Iraqi forces attack Mosul airport during an offensive to retake the western side of the city from jihadists of the Islamic State group on February 23, 2017. Iraqi forces entered Mosul airport, which lies on the southern edge of the city, for the first time since the Islamic State group overran the region in 2014.(AFP)
Updated on Feb 23, 2017 11:15 PM IST
Copy Link
AFP, Mosul Airport, Iraq | By

There was still morning mist in the air when Iraq’s Rapid Response units began their push to take Mosul airport from the Islamic State group on Thursday.

On a hilltop outside the village of Al-Buseif, the soldiers watched as helicopters fired rockets towards the airport and the adjacent sugar factory, held by the jihadist group since 2014.

“I love this sound,” said First Lieutenant Ahmed, as cannon fire snapped from the gunships, followed by roaring rocket fire.

A small crew of American soldiers worked to position mortars by their armoured vehicle as an air strike on Mosul in the distance sent grey smoke up in the sky.

An armoured ambulance belonging to the federal police blasted patriotic music, but the tunes were silenced after the troops noticed a suspected IS drone.

The jihadist group has regularly targeted Iraqi troops with grenades and shells dropped from drones, and the buzz of the pilotless aircraft now immediately puts soldiers on guard.

Several opened fire in the direction of the drone, but had no luck hitting it.

Gradually, they moved down the hilltop, some in armoured cars and others following on foot in the tracks of the vehicles ahead to avoid explosives embedded in the dirt, another favoured IS tactic.

At the bottom of the hill was Khirbeh, the last village between Al-Buseif and the airport.

Snipers

It came under sustained fire in recent days, prompting its residents to flee as IS fighters withdrew, and the signs of the fighting were everywhere.

The iron front gates of homes were crumpled in heaps, and in a dirt pen five cows lay dead on their sides.

Federal police moved through buildings in the village, looking for explosives.

In one house they found homemade mortars, and in another a stack of photocopied issues of IS’s Anba magazine.

Bulldozers drove down to the edge of the village, at the southwestern corner of the airport, to pile dirt onto the damaged road leading along its edge and to the entrance.

As they worked, helicopters fired rocket after rocket into the sugar factory next to the airport, across the road being repaired by the bulldozers.

“They are targeting possible IS vehicle bombs in the factory. From up there they can see what we can’t see from here,” one soldier speculated as a huge blaze erupted sending thick black smoke into the air.

The wind lifted ash from the fire, and it danced down through the air, landing among the forces waiting to enter the airport.

Finally, the road was ready, and a convoy of Rapid Response armoured cars began moving slowly north towards the sugar factory and the airport entrance opposite it.

On the way they passed the dead body of an IS fighter, lying half-burned next to his motorbike.

As they moved past the factory, an IED (improvised explosive device) detonated next to the convoy’s lead vehicle, sending soldiers running back away from the blast.

No one was injured, but the soldiers began to strafe the sugar factory from several Humvees, firing round after round.

Celebrations

“There are snipers inside,” one soldier shouted, as those on foot took cover behind the armoured vehicles.

Eventually the firing stopped, and part of the convoy broke away to move into the airport.

At the entrance stood a building reduced almost entirely to rubble, with just a few pillars indicating it had once had a second floor.

All around, the airport was torn up and littered with debris, with the runways virtually unrecognisable and completely unusable.

“From the southern edge to the northern edge, it’s completely destroyed,” said Brigadier General Abbas al-Juburi, from the Rapid Response units.

“The terrorists started damaging it from the first moment the operation (to take Mosul) began.”

Inside, sapper units worked to locate IEDs, with one policeman hunched over with his face inches from the ground as he paced slowly forward, looking for warning signs.

While he worked, others celebrated. On the road outside, a group of soldiers grinned broadly in front of their Humvee as they posed for a selfie.

One held a black IS flag, brought along for the purpose, turned upside down as a gesture of defiance.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Close Story
QUICKREADS

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

  • Professor Ajay Agrawal, who was honoured with the Order of Canada in the 2022 list. (Credit: University of Toronto)

    Two Indo-Canadian academics honoured with Order of Canada

    Two Indo-Canadian academics, working on research to advance the betterment of mankind, have been honoured with one of the country's most prestigious awards, the Order of Canada. Their names were in the list published by the office of the governor-general of Canada Mary Simon. Both have been invested (as the bestowal of the awards is described) into the Order as a Member. They are professors Ajay Agrawal and Parminder Raina.

  • SpaceX founder and chief engineer Elon Musk.

    Elon Musk's Twitter hiatus, in 2nd week now,  generates curiosity 

    The world's richest person, Elon Musk, has not tweeted in about 10 days and it can't go unnoticed. The 51-year-old business tycoon has 100 million followers on the microblogging site, which he is planning to buy. Since April, he has been making headlines for the $44 billion deal and his comments and concerns about the presence of a large number of fake accounts on Twitter.

  • A Taliban fighter stands guard at a news conference about a new command of hijab by Taliban leader Mullah Haibatullah Akhundzada, in Kabul, Afghanistan.

    Taliban's reclusive supreme leader attends gathering in Kabul: Report

    The Taliban's reclusive supreme leader Haibatullah Akhundzada joined a large gathering of nationwide religious leaders in Kabul on Friday, the state news agency said, adding he would give a speech. The Taliban's state-run Bakhtar News Agency confirmed the reclusive leader, who is based in the southern city of Kandahar, was attending the meeting of more than 3,000 male participants from around the country, aimed at discussing issues of national unity.

  • James Topp, a Canadian Forces veteran who marched across Canada protesting against the Covid-19 vaccines mandates, speaks to supporters as he arrives at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier and the National War Memorial ahead of Canada Day in Ottawa, Ontario, on Thursday. (REUTERS)

    July 1: Canada to mark 155th anniversary of its formation

    As the country prepares to celebrate the 155th anniversary of the formation of the Canadian Confederation, Canada Day, the traditional centre of festivities, Parliament Hill in Ottawa, will be off limits as protesters linked to the Freedom Convoy begin gathering in the capital for the long weekend. Various events have been listed by protesters including a march to Parliament Hill on Friday.

  • This image of a "Most Wanted" poster obtained from the FBI on June 30, 2022, shows Ruja Ignatova. - Ignatova, dubbed the "Crypto Queen." after she raised billions of dollars in a fraudulent virtual currency scheme was placed on the FBI's 10 most wanted fugitives list June 30, 2022. (Photo by Handout / FBI / AFP) / 

    Bulgaria's ‘Crypto Queen’ Ruja Ignatova added to FBI's most-wanted list

    A Bulgarian woman dubbed the "Crypto Queen" afteIgnatovahe raised billions of dollars in a fraudulent virtual currency scheme was placed on the FBI's 10 most wanted list Thursday. The Federal Bureau of Investigation put up a $100,000 reward for Ruja Ignatova, who disappeared in Greece in October 2017 around the time US authorities filed a sealed indictment and warrant for her arrest.

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Friday, July 01, 2022