Tear gas fired as thousands march in Sudan in anti-coup rallies

  • Waving flags, beating drums, dancing and chanting, crowds marched on the streets of Khartoum despite a heavy deployment of security forces -- who later fired tear gas canisters to break them up.
People march to the presidential palace, protesting against military rule following last month's coup in Khartoum, Sudan.(Reuters)
People march to the presidential palace, protesting against military rule following last month's coup in Khartoum, Sudan.(Reuters)
Published on Dec 25, 2021 06:55 PM IST
Copy Link
AFP |

Thousands of Sudanese protesters rallied Saturday two months on since a military coup, demanding soldiers "go back to the barracks" and calling for a transition to civilian rule.

Waving flags, beating drums, dancing and chanting, crowds marched on the streets of Khartoum despite a heavy deployment of security forces -- who later fired tear gas canisters to break them up.

Officers had earlier blocked bridges connecting the capital to suburbs, cut phone lines and restricted the internet ahead of the planned protests.

At least 48 people have died in crackdowns during weeks of protests, according to the independent Doctors' Committee, and Khartoum's state governor has warned that security forces "will deal with those who break the law and create chaos".

Demonstrators converged on the presidential palace in Khartoum, the headquarters of the military government in control since General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan seized power on October 25.

Burhan held civilian leader Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok under effective house arrest for weeks, but reinstated him on November 21 under a deal promising elections for July 2023.

The move alienated many of Hamdok's pro-democracy supporters, who dismissed it as providing a cloak of legitimacy for Burhan's coup.

Protesters online had encouraged supporters with slogans, including demanding "no negotiations" with the army.

As well as rallies in Khartoum and its suburbs, protesters also marched on the streets of Madani, a town around 150 kilometres (more than 90 miles) to the south, witnesses said.

- Internet cut at dawn -

Security forces with cranes used shipping containers to block the bridges across the Nile river connecting Khartoum to the cities of Omdurman and North Khartoum, and web monitoring group NetBlocks reported mobile internet was cut at sunrise on Saturday.

Activists reported the arrest of several colleagues beginning Friday night, and Volker Perthes, the UN special envoy to Sudan, urged the authorities to "protect" the protests not to stop them.

"Freedom of expression is a human right," Perthes said Saturday, adding that it includes "full access" to the internet. "No one should be arrested for his or her intention to protest peacefully."

"We draw the attention of the world and ask them to monitor what happens in Sudan on the issue of the revolutionary movement for freedom and democracy", said the Doctors' Committee, which is part of the pro-democracy movement.

Khartoum's governor warned that "approaching or attacking buildings of strategic sovereignty is punishable by law".

At rallies last Sunday, held on the third anniversary of mass demonstrations that led to the ouster of veteran strongman Omar al-Bashir, crowds began a "sit-in" protest outside the presidential palace.

- Rape used as 'weapon' -

Within hours, security forces dispersed the thousands of protesters with truncheons and firing tear gas canisters.

Activists have condemned sexual attacks during those protests, in which the UN said at least 13 women and girls were raped.

The European Union and the United States issued a joint statement Thursday condemning the use of sexual violence "as a weapon to drive women away from demonstrations and silence their voices".

Sudan, one of the world's poorest countries, has a long history of military coups, enjoying only rare interludes of democratic rule since independence in 1956.

Over 14 million people, a third of Sudan's population, will need humanitarian aid next year, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, the highest level for a decade.

Activists say more demonstrations are planned for December 30.

SHARE THIS ARTICLE ON
Topics
Close Story
QUICKREADS

Less time to read?

Try Quickreads

  • Xi Jinping's old speech on China front pages shows urgency to fix economy

    Xi Jinping's old speech on China front pages shows urgency to fix economy

    A six-month-old speech by President Xi Jinping on the need to preserve jobs and shore up growth was splashed across China's main financial newspapers on Monday, signaling greater urgency to bolster the economy after lockdowns brought Shanghai and other major cities to a halt. In the remarks, Xi voiced support for the “healthy development” of the private sector and entrepreneurs, but also warned that regulators must prevent “capital predators” from acting recklessly.

  • A resident looks out through a gap in the barrier at a residential area during lockdown, amid the coronavirus disease (Covid-19) pandemic, in Shanghai, China.

    Most of Shanghai ends Covid-19 spread, 1 million left in lockdown

    Most of Shanghai has stopped the spread of the coronavirus in the community and fewer than 1 million people remain under strict lockdown, authorities said Monday, as the city moves toward reopening and economic data showed the gloomy impact of China's “zero-COVID" policy. Vice Mayor Zong Ming said 15 out of Shanghai's 16 districts had eliminated virus transmission among those not already in quarantine.

  • Sri Lanka PM Ranil Wickremesinghe. (REUTERS FILE PHOTO)

    New Sri Lanka PM likely to provide ‘full explanation’ of financial crisis today

    Ranil Wickremesinghe, the new prime minister of Sri Lanka who was sworn-in last Thursday, is likely to address the country on Monday, in what would be the first national address of his record sixth term as the island nation's premier. During the speech, Wickremesinghe will present the 'full picture' of Sri Lanka's current economic crisis, its worst since 1948 when it gained independence from British rule.

  • A resident takes part in a round of Covid-19 testing during a lockdown in Shanghai, China

    Shanghai aims to return to normal life from June 1

    Shanghai aims to reopen broadly and allow normal life to resume from June 1, a city official said on Monday, after declaring that 15 of its 16 districts had eliminated cases outside quarantine areas. The city plans to gradually increase domestic flights and rail services, and from Monday will begin reopening supermarkets, convenience stores and pharmacies.

  • Orange County Sheriff's deputies guard the parking lot of Geneva Presbyterian Church in Laguna Woods, California after a fatal shooting.

    US witnesses 2 shootings in 48 hours, concerns over gun violence again: 5 points

    The United States witnessed two mass shootings within 48 hours, one of which was confirmed as racially motivated. In the Buffalo supermarket shooting, the gunman, identified as a white 18-year-old man, killed 10 and wounded three, most of them Black. On Sunday, a gunman went on a rampage at a church near Los Angeles, killing one and leaving four others in "critical" condition, as per the officials.

SHARE
Story Saved
×
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Monday, May 16, 2022