Low levels of Vitamin D can predict heart disease | health and fitness | Hindustan Times
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Low levels of Vitamin D can predict heart disease

Low levels of total vitamin D and bio-available vitamin D can help predict a person’s risk of major adverse cardiovascular events such as a heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death, according to a recent study.

health and fitness Updated: Apr 05, 2016 08:30 IST
A study tested many different types of vitamin D, but found that measuring total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D were the most accurate in predicting harmful cardiovascular events.
A study tested many different types of vitamin D, but found that measuring total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D were the most accurate in predicting harmful cardiovascular events.(Shutterstock)

Low levels of total vitamin D and bio-available vitamin D can help predict a person’s risk of major adverse cardiovascular events such as a heart attack, stroke, heart failure or death, according to a recent study.

“Our study found that low levels of both total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D appear to be associated with poor cardiovascular outcomes,” said lead author Heidi May from the Intermountain Medical Center Heart Institute.

Read: Believe it or not! Over 80% people in India are Vit D deficient

The study evaluated 4,200 participants between the ages of 52 and 76. A quarter of the study participants were diabetic and 70% had coronary artery disease.

The study tested many different types of vitamin D, but found that measuring total vitamin D and bioavailable vitamin D were the most accurate in predicting harmful cardiovascular events.

“This study is the first research that evaluates the association of vitamin D metabolites with cardiovascular events,” said Dr. May. “And evaluating usable vitamin D could mean the difference on the amount of vitamin D prescribed, if it’s prescribed at all.”

Read: Finally, sunscreen that doesn’t block but gives you instant Vitamin D

The study expands on the results of several observational studies, including some performed at Intermountain Healthcare, but researchers recommend conducting more studies on non-Caucasian populations because past research shows vitamin D metabolites affect Caucasian and non-Caucasian races differently.

Results are presented at the American College of Cardiology Scientific Sessions in Chicago. (ANI)

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