Photos: Gurugram residents turn urban farmers to fight pesticides and chemicals

Updated On Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

Concerned about what food they and their families eat, a group of Gurugram residents have taken up urban organic farming by leasing out land from local farmers to grow vegetables and fruits. In times of compact and closed spaces, with hardly any available in homes to grow plants, such an initiative has been openly welcomed and drawn participants. The Millennial city's residents are also taking voluntarily steps to conserve natural resources and increasingly making efforts to achieve a zero-waste goal.

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Sunil Bisht, a Gurugram resident cultivates a batch of sweet potatoes in the foothills of the Aravallis in Gairatpur Bas village, around 15 kilometres from Gurugram. Apart from him around 15 people are toiling on their farms, composting, manuring and harvesting for the upcoming week. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

Sunil Bisht, a Gurugram resident cultivates a batch of sweet potatoes in the foothills of the Aravallis in Gairatpur Bas village, around 15 kilometres from Gurugram. Apart from him around 15 people are toiling on their farms, composting, manuring and harvesting for the upcoming week. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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Dheeraj Garg, loves grown produce from the patch. What brings these corporates, who work in multinational companies and live in upscale localities, together, is an eagerness to cultivate their own vegetables and also a concern that their families are eating fruits and vegetables contaminated with pesticides and chemical fertilisers. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

Dheeraj Garg, loves grown produce from the patch. What brings these corporates, who work in multinational companies and live in upscale localities, together, is an eagerness to cultivate their own vegetables and also a concern that their families are eating fruits and vegetables contaminated with pesticides and chemical fertilisers. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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Around 52 Gurugram-based families such as Rajeev’s have embraced urban organic farming by leasing out land from local farmers to grow vegetables and fruits. “The feeling of growing something from scratch cannot be matched by anything else,” said Nidhi, who claims she was among the first people to start farming at the location. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

Around 52 Gurugram-based families such as Rajeev’s have embraced urban organic farming by leasing out land from local farmers to grow vegetables and fruits. “The feeling of growing something from scratch cannot be matched by anything else,” said Nidhi, who claims she was among the first people to start farming at the location. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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This programme managed by Green Leaf India, and a group of farmers, is currently running on a membership basis. Members are charged around Rs27,000 for six months for a 600 square yard plot. The amount includes the cost of seeds, manure and the salaries of those hired to look after the farms in their absence. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

This programme managed by Green Leaf India, and a group of farmers, is currently running on a membership basis. Members are charged around Rs27,000 for six months for a 600 square yard plot. The amount includes the cost of seeds, manure and the salaries of those hired to look after the farms in their absence. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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The community grows almost everything at the farms — potatoes to bitter gourd and watermelons to mushrooms. The members came together in 2016, when Gurugram district’s horticulture officer, Deen Mohammad Khan, while delivering a presentation on home gardening to a group of people in a society, was asked by the residents to start an organic farm for them to grow vegetables. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

The community grows almost everything at the farms — potatoes to bitter gourd and watermelons to mushrooms. The members came together in 2016, when Gurugram district’s horticulture officer, Deen Mohammad Khan, while delivering a presentation on home gardening to a group of people in a society, was asked by the residents to start an organic farm for them to grow vegetables. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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“We live in compact and closed spaces. There is hardly any space to grow plants, which is why an initiative like this was widely welcomed,” Seema, a resident of Central Park 2 society, said. These urban farmers said the produce is enough for their consumption for a week and sometimes, there is a surplus for their friends and neighbours. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

“We live in compact and closed spaces. There is hardly any space to grow plants, which is why an initiative like this was widely welcomed,” Seema, a resident of Central Park 2 society, said. These urban farmers said the produce is enough for their consumption for a week and sometimes, there is a surplus for their friends and neighbours. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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The members’ children also get their hands dirty in the farms on weekends. “My eight-year-old son starts jumping around early morning on weekends, asking us to take him to the farm. It’s a nice getaway from the city too,” a member, who lives in South City 1, said. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

The members’ children also get their hands dirty in the farms on weekends. “My eight-year-old son starts jumping around early morning on weekends, asking us to take him to the farm. It’s a nice getaway from the city too,” a member, who lives in South City 1, said. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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Organic farming and permaculture are now a visible trend in Gurugram. Several condominiums have taken steps to voluntarily promote natural resource conservation by reusing, recycling and reducing solid waste. City dwellers strapped for space are planting vegetables on their terraces, backyards and small balconies. A citizens’ movement in the city, which believes that chemical-free food is not a privilege but a right, has led to fresh farm produce coming in every week. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)
Updated on Jun 23, 2018 11:27 AM IST

Organic farming and permaculture are now a visible trend in Gurugram. Several condominiums have taken steps to voluntarily promote natural resource conservation by reusing, recycling and reducing solid waste. City dwellers strapped for space are planting vegetables on their terraces, backyards and small balconies. A citizens’ movement in the city, which believes that chemical-free food is not a privilege but a right, has led to fresh farm produce coming in every week. (Sanjeev Verma / HT Photo)

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