These festivals and rituals practised in India will surely give you chills | Hindustan Times
close_game
close_game

These festivals and rituals practised in India will surely give you chills

Updated On May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Many people travel to India to witness some of the most famous festivals celebrated in the country like Holi, Diwali, Durga Puja etc. While you must have heard about these popular ones, there are a few unusual festivals celebrated across villages in India that might take you by surprise.

1 / 8
Here are a few strange festivals and rituals practised in parts of India that will surely leave you awestruck.(Instagram) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Here are a few strange festivals and rituals practised in parts of India that will surely leave you awestruck.(Instagram)

2 / 8
Thaipoosam: This is celebrated in Tamil Nadu and parts of southern India during the month of Thai. Devotees hook their flesh and pierce their body with skewers and lances called vel. It is a way of honouring Lord Murugan (or Kartikeya, the son of Shiva and Parvati).(Instagram/ninesnaps) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Thaipoosam: This is celebrated in Tamil Nadu and parts of southern India during the month of Thai. Devotees hook their flesh and pierce their body with skewers and lances called vel. It is a way of honouring Lord Murugan (or Kartikeya, the son of Shiva and Parvati).(Instagram/ninesnaps)

3 / 8
Puli Kali: This festival is also called 'Play of the Tiger' and is celebrated mainly in the Thrissur district of Kerala on the fourth day of Onam. Several men come out on the streets with painted bodies and masks and perform with bursting energy.(Instagram/to_c_xy) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Puli Kali: This festival is also called 'Play of the Tiger' and is celebrated mainly in the Thrissur district of Kerala on the fourth day of Onam. Several men come out on the streets with painted bodies and masks and perform with bursting energy.(Instagram/to_c_xy)

4 / 8
Theemithi: This ritual of devotees walking on fire was originated in Tamil Nadu and then spread to Sri Lanka, Singapore and South Africa. They practise it in exchange for a wish or blessing granted by the goddess Draupadi. (Instagram/thetarzanway) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Theemithi: This ritual of devotees walking on fire was originated in Tamil Nadu and then spread to Sri Lanka, Singapore and South Africa. They practise it in exchange for a wish or blessing granted by the goddess Draupadi. (Instagram/thetarzanway)

5 / 8
Nag Panchami: Also known as the festival of snakes, is celebrated on the fifth day of the lunar month of Shravan to honour 'Nagoba,' the snake king. This festival is celebrated across India and Nepal where live Cobras, without removing their venomous fangs, are worshipped. It is also believed that snakes do not bite on this particular day. (Instagram/archsourabh) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Nag Panchami: Also known as the festival of snakes, is celebrated on the fifth day of the lunar month of Shravan to honour 'Nagoba,' the snake king. This festival is celebrated across India and Nepal where live Cobras, without removing their venomous fangs, are worshipped. It is also believed that snakes do not bite on this particular day. (Instagram/archsourabh)

6 / 8
Garudan Thookam: This fascinating ritual is performed in Kerela's Kali temples where dancers deck up as 'Garadu,' the vehicle of Lord Vishnu who quenched the goddess Kali's thirst with the blood of demon Darika. After their performance, they hook themselves from a shaft.(Instagram/harikrishnan.97) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Garudan Thookam: This fascinating ritual is performed in Kerela's Kali temples where dancers deck up as 'Garadu,' the vehicle of Lord Vishnu who quenched the goddess Kali's thirst with the blood of demon Darika. After their performance, they hook themselves from a shaft.(Instagram/harikrishnan.97)

7 / 8
Pushkar Camel Fair: This festival is held in Pushkar, Rajasthan in November at the time of the Kartik Purnima full moon. Over 50,000 camels are shaved, decked up, paraded, participates in beauty contests, races, and are also traded. Folk musicians, dancers and snake charmers also gather to entertain the crowd.(Instagram/shikhar__saini) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Pushkar Camel Fair: This festival is held in Pushkar, Rajasthan in November at the time of the Kartik Purnima full moon. Over 50,000 camels are shaved, decked up, paraded, participates in beauty contests, races, and are also traded. Folk musicians, dancers and snake charmers also gather to entertain the crowd.(Instagram/shikhar__saini)

8 / 8
Kesh Lochan of Jain saints: Plucking of hair out by the hand is practised by Jain monks and nuns. In many of their texts, hair is often considered as a metaphor for human illusion, attachment and vanity. So they believe that by doing this they will attain Moksha or redemption. (Instagram/acharyashree_sunilsagarji) expand-icon View Photos in a new improved layout
Updated on May 29, 2021 07:16 PM IST

Kesh Lochan of Jain saints: Plucking of hair out by the hand is practised by Jain monks and nuns. In many of their texts, hair is often considered as a metaphor for human illusion, attachment and vanity. So they believe that by doing this they will attain Moksha or redemption. (Instagram/acharyashree_sunilsagarji)

SHARE
Story Saved
Live Score
Saved Articles
Following
My Reads
Sign out
New Delhi 0C
Sunday, June 16, 2024
Start 14 Days Free Trial Subscribe Now
Follow Us On