New Delhi -°C
Today in New Delhi, India

Jan 19, 2020-Sunday
-°C

Humidity
-

Wind
-

Select city

Metro cities - Delhi, Mumbai, Chennai, Kolkata

Other cities - Noida, Gurgaon, Bengaluru, Hyderabad, Bhopal , Chandigarh , Dehradun, Indore, Jaipur, Lucknow, Patna, Ranchi

Sunday, Jan 19, 2020
Home / More Lifestyle / Livable art in pottery is the forte of this artist and her annual show

Livable art in pottery is the forte of this artist and her annual show

Captivating, majestic and safe for the environment, that’s pottery artist Anju Kumar’s latest collection titled Sacred Symphony.

more-lifestyle Updated: Oct 03, 2019 17:48 IST
Naina Arora
Naina Arora
Hindustan Times
Anju Kumar’s annual show displays her artworks that comprise a gold leafing floral mural, swarna mural, boat urli, abstract vases with gold motifs, artworks, table stands, floor lamps, tulsi chauras, pillars, chowkis, and diyas, along with a series of Buddhas in meditative and serene moods, and sculptures of Ganesha.
Anju Kumar’s annual show displays her artworks that comprise a gold leafing floral mural, swarna mural, boat urli, abstract vases with gold motifs, artworks, table stands, floor lamps, tulsi chauras, pillars, chowkis, and diyas, along with a series of Buddhas in meditative and serene moods, and sculptures of Ganesha.
         

Festive season isn’t just a time of celebration but also one that needs us to be more mindful of our indulgences. At a time when the world and our country is shunning the use of single-use plastic and going eco-friendly, here’s an exhibition that features art that is sustainable yet enchanting.

Captivating, majestic and safe for the environment, that’s pottery artist Anju Kumar’s latest collection titled Sacred Symphony. Her annual show displays her artworks that comprise a gold leafing floral mural, swarna mural, boat urli, abstract vases with gold motifs, artworks, table stands, floor lamps, tulsi chauras, pillars, chowkis, and diyas, along with a series of Buddhas in meditative and serene moods, and sculptures of Ganesha.

Hindustantimes

“Pottery is a tradition we all have grown up with. There are so many things which we have to unlearn, rather than learn now. We are going away from our roots. We should come back with something we have known, enjoyed and decorated,” says Kumar, adding, “I like to work with anything that symbolises positivity such as the lotus and the tree of life, because it’s livable art. Each piece emotes its energy, and that changes the configuration of the place where you live.”

The artist calls her works “meditative” and holds them close to her “heart”. So, when it came to selecting the title, she says, “The title came with a lot of contemplation, meditation, and connecting with the inner spirit.”

Kumar, who has an experience of three decades, says the acceptance of this art form has increased multifold over the years. “It’s tremendous. Earlier, pottery was very functional but wasn’t an art form... Pottery is my first love because of the kind of flexibility and freedom it gives. It’s beautiful right from its inception to blossoming of the final product,” she says adding, “I wanted the collection to have any earthy feel.”

naina.arora@htdigital.in
Follow more stories on Facebook and Twitter