Photos: NGT orders a cracker-free Diwali for Delhi-NCR

UPDATED ON NOV 10, 2020 11:31 AM IST
Salesmen sit outside a closed firecrackers shop in Old Delhi, on November 7. The National Green Tribunal (NGT) on November 9 called for a complete ban on the sale and burning of firecrackers in the Delhi-NCR region, to be put into effect from midnight November 9 to November 30. (Kamal Kishore / PTI)
People out at Rajpath on a smog ridden afternoon due to rising pollution in New Delhi on November 9. The NGT ban comes in the wake of Delhi’s pollution levels rising at alarming levels and staying put in the “severe” quality for days now. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
Representatives of firecracker sellers’ associations demonstrate against a Delhi government ban on firecrackers ahead of Diwali in New Delhi on November 8. After medical experts linked a sharp surge in Covid-19 cases to rising air pollution, CM Arvind Kejriwal announced on November 5 that Delhi would go firecrackers free in a bid to stronghold both air pollution and rising contagion. The CM’s decision was met with a few protests. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A woman walks past a mural on Covid-19 awareness in New Delhi on November 7. On November 8, Delhi recorded its biggest ever single day jump of 7,745 Covid-19 cases and 77 deaths which pushed the tally and death toll to 438,529 and 6,989 respectively, HT reported. (Sajjad Hussain / AFP)
Customers look to buy green crackers ahead of Diwali at Dariba Kalan in New Delhi on November 5. Meanwhile, taking the matters into its hands, the NGT ordered that except for Delhi-NCR, the ban will be applicable in cities and towns where the air quality is in “poor” category, news agency ANI reported. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)
Customers buy firecrackers ahead of Diwali in Allahabad on November 9. However, in cities or towns where the air quality is “moderate” or below, only green fire crackers will be sold and the time duration for bursting them will be restricted to two hours on the day of the festivities. (Sanjay Kanojia / AFP)
Salespersons sitting outside closed firecracker shops after the implementation of a state government ban on bursting and sale of all kinds of firecrackers from November 7 to November 30, in light of rising air pollution, in Delhi on November 7. (Kamal Kishore / PTI)

Salesmen sit outside a closed firecrackers shop in Old Delhi, on November 7. The National Green Tribunal (NGT) on November 9 called for a complete ban on the sale and burning of firecrackers in the Delhi-NCR region, to be put into effect from midnight November 9 to November 30. (Kamal Kishore / PTI)

People out at Rajpath on a smog ridden afternoon due to rising pollution in New Delhi on November 9. The NGT ban comes in the wake of Delhi’s pollution levels rising at alarming levels and staying put in the “severe” quality for days now. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Representatives of firecracker sellers’ associations demonstrate against a Delhi government ban on firecrackers ahead of Diwali in New Delhi on November 8. After medical experts linked a sharp surge in Covid-19 cases to rising air pollution, CM Arvind Kejriwal announced on November 5 that Delhi would go firecrackers free in a bid to stronghold both air pollution and rising contagion. The CM’s decision was met with a few protests. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A woman walks past a mural on Covid-19 awareness in New Delhi on November 7. On November 8, Delhi recorded its biggest ever single day jump of 7,745 Covid-19 cases and 77 deaths which pushed the tally and death toll to 438,529 and 6,989 respectively, HT reported. (Sajjad Hussain / AFP)

Customers look to buy green crackers ahead of Diwali at Dariba Kalan in New Delhi on November 5. Meanwhile, taking the matters into its hands, the NGT ordered that except for Delhi-NCR, the ban will be applicable in cities and towns where the air quality is in “poor” category, news agency ANI reported. (Raj K Raj / HT Photo)

Customers buy firecrackers ahead of Diwali in Allahabad on November 9. However, in cities or towns where the air quality is “moderate” or below, only green fire crackers will be sold and the time duration for bursting them will be restricted to two hours on the day of the festivities. (Sanjay Kanojia / AFP)

Salespersons sitting outside closed firecracker shops after the implementation of a state government ban on bursting and sale of all kinds of firecrackers from November 7 to November 30, in light of rising air pollution, in Delhi on November 7. (Kamal Kishore / PTI)

About The Gallery

The National Green Tribunal (NGT) on November 9 called for a complete ban on the sale and burning of firecrackers in the Delhi-NCR region, to be put into effect from the midnight of November 9 to November 30. The ban comes in the wake of the capital's worsening pollution crisis and the upcoming Diwali festival. Delhi's air quality level has been in the “severe” zone for nearly a week now. For areas where the NGT has not banned firecrackers outright, time restrictions and sale of only green crackers will be allowed to keep the air quality from declining.

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