Photos: Farmers reject early talks, march stays put at Delhi’s borders

UPDATED ON NOV 29, 2020 06:07 PM IST
A cloud of tear gas forms from a cannister fired by Delhi Police to disperse farmers waiting to enter the national capital in protest against farm reform laws, at Singhu Border near New Delhi on November 27. After making their way through Haryana, thousands of farmers knocked on the national capital on November 27 under the “Delhi Chalo” call against the agri-marketing laws enacted at the Centre in September. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Police personnel behind barbed wire laid out to impede advancing farmers at Singhu Border on November 27. Most protesters are from Punjab, but there is a substantial number from Haryana as well. There has been scattered support for the “Delhi Chalo” protest from Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttarakhand, PTI reported. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Farmers bring down barricades installed at Punjab-Haryana border on November 27. Skirmishes were reported at the Punjab-Haryana border even on November 27, after attempts to block thousands of farmers similarly a day prior. Farmers and police faced off at other points as well on the highway as it passed through BJP-run Haryana. (Sanjeev Kumar / HT Photo)
Members of farmers' groups raise slogans while waiting to enter the national capital at Singhu Border on November 27. Farmer unions in Punjab and Haryana say the recent reform laws will dismantle the minimum support price (MSP) system. They argue that over time big corporate houses will dictate terms and farmers will end up getting less for their crops. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Farmers seen on top of police vehicles after being halted while marching to Delhi, at Singhu Border on November 27. Tear gas and water cannons were used first by the Haryana and later the Delhi Police on the advancing farmers. In some instances, the demonstrators wrested control from the police and managed to shut off the cannons. Elsewhere, they dismantled barriers and overcame dug-up roads. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
The Sant Nirankari Ground being fogged win preparation for the farmers’ march in Burari, New Delhi on November 27. After it’s requests to turn city stadiums into temporary jails were refused by the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government, the Delhi Police offered to let farmers into the city and continue their protest at the Burari ground. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
A rainbow forms as a water cannon is fired to disperse farmers at Singhu Border on November 27. While housing arrangements were being ironed out, protesters assembled at Delhi’s border at Tigri and Singhu faced tear gas and water cannons to stop them from breaking through barricades, which included sand-laden trucks. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
Delhi Police personnel baton charge a participant in the farmers' march to Delhi at Singhu Border on November 27. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)
The Sant Nirankari Ground in Burari nearly empty a day after it was offered as a protest site to farmers, in New Delhi on November 28. Only a small section had proceeded from Singhu Border on November 27. Joint Commissioner of Police (Northern range) Surender Singh Yadav, told reporters that around 600 to 700 farmers had reached the north Delhi ground . (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
Protesting farmers at the Singhu Border near New Delhi on November 28. The standoff, entering its third day, continued on November 28 at Delhi’s border when instead of occupying the ground, thousands of farmers, reluctant of the police offer, remained camped around the national capital. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)
Come morning, the Singhu Border campsite burst into scenes of hospitality as farmers united under the march set up communal kitchens and shared meals among each other. Visuals on social media showed the farmers distributing and serving meals to the very police personnel whom they had been pitted against earlier in the day along the march. (Vipin Kumar/HT PHOTO)
Home minister Amit Shah has requested farmers to halt their agitations and discuss issues they are facing with the Centre of December 3. Farmers’ bodies refused the offer on November 29, demanding the Centre name and authorise a Cabinet committee or a group of ministers for future discussions. Camped at Delhi’s doors, farmers told news agencies that they had come prepared for the long haul, with food and provisions for winter ahead. (Biplov Bhuyan / HT Photo)

A cloud of tear gas forms from a cannister fired by Delhi Police to disperse farmers waiting to enter the national capital in protest against farm reform laws, at Singhu Border near New Delhi on November 27. After making their way through Haryana, thousands of farmers knocked on the national capital on November 27 under the “Delhi Chalo” call against the agri-marketing laws enacted at the Centre in September. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

Police personnel behind barbed wire laid out to impede advancing farmers at Singhu Border on November 27. Most protesters are from Punjab, but there is a substantial number from Haryana as well. There has been scattered support for the “Delhi Chalo” protest from Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Uttarakhand, PTI reported. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

Farmers bring down barricades installed at Punjab-Haryana border on November 27. Skirmishes were reported at the Punjab-Haryana border even on November 27, after attempts to block thousands of farmers similarly a day prior. Farmers and police faced off at other points as well on the highway as it passed through BJP-run Haryana. (Sanjeev Kumar / HT Photo)

Members of farmers' groups raise slogans while waiting to enter the national capital at Singhu Border on November 27. Farmer unions in Punjab and Haryana say the recent reform laws will dismantle the minimum support price (MSP) system. They argue that over time big corporate houses will dictate terms and farmers will end up getting less for their crops. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

Farmers seen on top of police vehicles after being halted while marching to Delhi, at Singhu Border on November 27. Tear gas and water cannons were used first by the Haryana and later the Delhi Police on the advancing farmers. In some instances, the demonstrators wrested control from the police and managed to shut off the cannons. Elsewhere, they dismantled barriers and overcame dug-up roads. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

The Sant Nirankari Ground being fogged win preparation for the farmers’ march in Burari, New Delhi on November 27. After it’s requests to turn city stadiums into temporary jails were refused by the Aam Aadmi Party (AAP) government, the Delhi Police offered to let farmers into the city and continue their protest at the Burari ground. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

A rainbow forms as a water cannon is fired to disperse farmers at Singhu Border on November 27. While housing arrangements were being ironed out, protesters assembled at Delhi’s border at Tigri and Singhu faced tear gas and water cannons to stop them from breaking through barricades, which included sand-laden trucks. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

Delhi Police personnel baton charge a participant in the farmers' march to Delhi at Singhu Border on November 27. (Sanchit Khanna / HT Photo)

The Sant Nirankari Ground in Burari nearly empty a day after it was offered as a protest site to farmers, in New Delhi on November 28. Only a small section had proceeded from Singhu Border on November 27. Joint Commissioner of Police (Northern range) Surender Singh Yadav, told reporters that around 600 to 700 farmers had reached the north Delhi ground . (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Protesting farmers at the Singhu Border near New Delhi on November 28. The standoff, entering its third day, continued on November 28 at Delhi’s border when instead of occupying the ground, thousands of farmers, reluctant of the police offer, remained camped around the national capital. (Vipin Kumar / HT Photo)

Come morning, the Singhu Border campsite burst into scenes of hospitality as farmers united under the march set up communal kitchens and shared meals among each other. Visuals on social media showed the farmers distributing and serving meals to the very police personnel whom they had been pitted against earlier in the day along the march. (Vipin Kumar/HT PHOTO)

Home minister Amit Shah has requested farmers to halt their agitations and discuss issues they are facing with the Centre of December 3. Farmers’ bodies refused the offer on November 29, demanding the Centre name and authorise a Cabinet committee or a group of ministers for future discussions. Camped at Delhi’s doors, farmers told news agencies that they had come prepared for the long haul, with food and provisions for winter ahead. (Biplov Bhuyan / HT Photo)

About The Gallery

After a day of clashes with police, who used tear gas, water cannons and baton charges to push them back, housands of farmers were camped outside the national capital on November 28, having reached on their tractor-trolleys and other vehicles. The protestors assembled in response to the “Delhi Chalo” call against the agri-marketing laws enacted at the Centre in September which they say could devastate crop prices. The government meanwhile sought talks with their leaders and those camped outside Delhi maintained they would not return to their homes until their demands were met.

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